Programmes

BA(HONS)

Film

Find your voice through the art of cinematic storytelling.

Film resembles so many other arts, however it is in itself a unique medium. Film prizes the collaborative process, and the programme sits in a privileged position of being able to tap into the ecosystem of the various arms of an arts college. While doing so, the primary focus of the programme is to nurture its students to find their own voice through the art of cinematic storytelling.

This programme answers the call of the local and international film communities, which seek reflective practitioners empowered by the capacity for creativity and authenticity. Through practice-based learning instilled with critical thinking, you will be inspired to communicate within a cinematic framework and explore various narrative environments, such as short and feature films, documentaries and television commercials, with an emphasis on professional and broadcast standards.

While keeping with the current advances in technology, the programme also observes that these are mere tools in the overall architecture of content. Although new technologies always have and will continue to have an impact on the realisation of artistic works, the programme emphasises skills and knowledge that refer to the artistic and conceptual traditions in film, especially in the area of storytelling and all the film-related disciplines – from screenwriting, directing and producing, to cinematography, sound, editing and production design.

Course Details

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Duration

3 years

Mode

Full Time

Modules
Level 1

You will establish your groundwork in filmmaking and theoretical approaches needed for the study of film. You will be introduced to the disciplines of screenwriting, producing, directing, cinematography, sound recording, sound-designing, editing and production design.

Film Practice I: Screenwriting, Directing and Producing — Introduction (20 CU)
This module will introduce you to the work field of the key initiators of any film, such as screenwriters, directors and producers.

In the module component of Screenwriting, Introduction to Screenwriting, you will learn the function and purpose of story, the fundamentals of screenplay structure which at this point looks at a linear storytelling, the nature of scenes as basic building blocks and finally, script format and elements of style.

This module has complementary workshops to enhance your initiating skills: Developing Story Ideas introduces the philosophy of visual treatment, story development and progression. Creativity techniques, study of setting, character development, conflict and thematic choice are other issues introduced.

The module component of Directing, Film Directing Fundamentals: From Script to Screen provides you with a clear and concise methodology, addressing both the art and craft of directing. Various film directing exercises offer you a concrete, proactive approach, by nurturing the directors to cultivate a strong level of engagement with their audience emotionally by first of all becoming clear on their story, then orchestrating its progression and dramatic escalation, by means of the organisation of action through dramatic blocks, subtext and narrative beats. 

A sub-component of Directing is Photography, where the exploration of photography as a disciplined way of seeing while exploring a single location and expressing it into a single idea. Readings, observations and photographs will form the basis of discussion on landscape, light, significant detail, place, people, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform, support, design and inspire the planning of a cinematic project.

In the module component of Producing, Introduction to the Film Production Process will define the roles and functions of a film crew, with an emphasis on understanding the chain of command and responsibilities. You will get a clear overview of a Film Production, from preproduction to post-production to the delivery of the film production. In terms of exercise, you will learn how to break down a script, according to a set of parameters in order to make a shooting schedule.

Last but not least, a final sub-component of Film Practice I/Module I, culminates in the Student Portfolio Project 1, where every student will have to create a small-scale film project which focuses on their learning curve in Semester 1. The Student Portfolio Project is unique to the programme, where the acquisition of knowledge and skills across Film Practice I, II as well as Critical Film Studies in Semester 1 will have the opportunity to render itself in this project. You will be required to be self-aware and observe your surroundings as part of your exploration and research for ‘story’ material, from your own life and experiences. It is research by portfolio in the form of an individual film project that will give you the opportunity to gain and develop insights into how to be organised in writing, directing and producing the best available source of artistic material: Your own life experience. These individual projects are pitched to a panel of practice lecturers, and in weekly group critique sessions the you present your work-in-progress.

This module will also visit the required film screening and analyse respective areas from each film, covering Screenwriting, Directing and Producing.

Personal and Professional Development 1
This non-assessed module is where you will periodically learn to draw from historical context, directors and methods of directing that inspire you. You will also begin to start a journal that looks at your initial aim and intended role in filmmaking. This is aimed at helping you understand which areas you find challenging, and which ones you excel at, in the collaborative aspect of filmmaking.

Film Practice II: Cinematography, Sound and Post-production — Introduction (20 CU)
This module will introduce you to the work field of the other concurrently running key disciplines of filmmaking, such as the collaborative efforts and work of directors of photography, production designers, camera operators, sound engineers, sound designers and film editors.

In the module component of Cinematography, Introduction to Camera and Lighting, you will learn about the creative responsibilities of the cinematographer from the use of the lenses, the range of frame sizes, focal length, screen ratios and formats. Through hands-on practice, you will familiarise yourself with the function of the camera and basic lighting. You will also understand the importance of safety measures prior to setting up any practical exercise.

In the sub-component of Cinematography, Production Design and Introduction to Production Design will initiate you into the world of production design, while experimenting with film vocabulary. This module component will introduce the design process and practical issues involved in realising a creative vision. During these sessions, you will consider the close relationship between the director, production designer and cinematographer.

Within the module component of Sound, there will be two sub-components of Location Sound Recording, where you will be inducted to recognise how invaluable recorded sound is to film. You will learn how to tell a story only with recorded sound, and then match your story with a layer of newly shot images. The second half of the semester will acquaint you with the other sub-component of Sound, with the basic functions of Sound Design.

In the module component of Post-production, Basics of Film Editing is designed to introduce the knowledge of the aesthetical and technical aspects of editing, conforming and finishing a film project using appropriate software and hardware. Several projects, to be edited on an individual basis, progressively challenge yout to devise a structure and aesthetic sensibility unique to each assignment.

In addition to enhancing the learning of these components, a short, initial seminar on Introduction in Location Scouting will give you the necessary insights into assessing a good location for a film and explain the added value of what a good location can bring to a film.

Critical Film Studies: History of Film (20 CU)
This module introduces you to critical studies that trace and analyse film history. It provides a general introduction to the history and the development of film. Extensive exploration will be given to historic film cultures and practices, major cinematic movements, and their different and distinct structures. The study of film history will encompass cinema from its inception, through the studio era and present day.

Curriculum Screening for History of Film will expound, through a series of weekly screenings, the link between theory and practice. These films will be subjected to critical analysis in terms of relevance and application with regards to film history, as well from an introduction to filmmaking background respectively, be it screenwriting (script analysis), directing (directorial choices), production (the film making process), cinematography, editing or sound and music.

You will be given writing exercises to gauge comprehension of subject matter and comparative analysis of approaches to film practices. The tutorial sessions will introduce you to the requirements and practice of academic research and writing.

You will learn to review and make statements about different approaches to specific areas of filmmaking that you are drawn to. You will periodically write a film response to articulate your perspectives on screened films.

Film Practice I: Screenwriting, Directing and Producing — Classical Narrative (20 CU)
In the module component of Screenwriting, Development and Writing for Location Short Film Production, you are prepared for the role and responsibilities of the screenwriter, in providing the blueprint for producing a short narrative location film project. Classes cover both original screenplay and adapted writing from previous works, such as a novel, play or short story, and enable you to translate fictional works and imaginary content into an artistic cinematic language. The classes also introduce you to particular standards in screenwriting used in the film industry.

In the module component of Directing, Directing for Location Short Film Production, you take on a comparative approach to expound on a ‘style versus story’ technique in order to gain insight into genre and how if affects the intrinsic dramatic structures of a film.

In a collaborative effort based on existing two-character scenes, you learn the basic approach of directing, working with the actor and acting vocabulary to achieve the best out of a performance in front of a camera.

In the module component of Producing, you apply your introductory film production knowledge to the Location Short Film Production with the Breakdown and Scheduling Exercises and Photo Boarding for Location Short Film Production as essential preparatory tools for the actual group exercise. You are introduced to the essential component of a professional Film Production File, and apply this to the same group exercise.

Finally, there is a second small-scale individual film project, Student Portfolio Project 2, a short narrative film project, to be developed freely as a research by portfolio sub-component. Again, Student Portfolio Project works at increasing your cognitive skills, providing an avenue for you to reflect and translate what you have learnt in Semester 2 within Film Practices I, II and Critical Film Studies. You will be expected to write, direct and produce this project. The development of this project, using a linear storytelling method of three acts, includes a pitch followed by a treatment or outline for a short feature film. You will prepare, shoot and edit this small scale project, by concentrating exclusively on the opening scene. You will be asked to supplement your presentation with a comparative analysis of your directorial work, with existing master directors. In weekly Group Critique Sessions, you will present your work-in-progress.

In the module sub-component, Group Short Film Project (First Film), you will work in teams under supervision of lecturers, to realise scripts which were selected by a Panel for development in Semester 1. Student-led, researched, developed and designed by you, you will take on key roles from pre-production, production and post-production. This Group Short Film Project (First Film) happens in Semester 2 at both Levels 1 (FHEQ-4) and 2 (FHEQ-5).

Film Practice II: Cinematography, Sound and Post-production — Classical Narrative (20 CU)
This module in Semester 2 enables you to explore and analyse the linear aspect of storytelling and filmmaking from the perspective of Cinematography, Production Design, Sound and Post-production.

In the module component of Cinematography, exercises build on the knowledge of the previous introductory semester, and concentrate on the motivation for the movement and blocking of the camera, cinematic continuity and light measuring.

In Workshop Portfolio 1: Camera and Lighting, you will explore how to enhance your storytelling capabilities with the camera and lighting, in a research-based, student-led production, and under the supervision of lecturers and in collaboration with students outside the programme, such as from Performing Arts.

The sub-component of Production Design takes a more hands-on approach in supporting you, as you design and dress the set for your Short Film Project. In finding practical solutions in realising your creative vision, you will also learn to work closely as an Art Department. Likewise, the collaborative relationship between Director, Production Designer and Cinematographer will be emphasised.

In the module component of Sound, a variety of sound exercises guide you through the process of gaining experience in key skills and techniques before you embark on the main project for the semester. You will further develop your abilities in the sub-component of Sound Recording, by recording sound on-location with the use of the various types of recording methods and hardware. In the second sub-component of Sound Design, a selection of films that utilise sound in creative and communicative ways form the context of this course. Experimentation and collaboration will be encouraged and you will be able to broaden your approach to filmmaking through the exploration of the potential sound brings to this medium, both in recording and in editing sound. An additional Seminar on Music for Film will introduce you to this powerful film parameter.

In the module component of Post-production, Editing Aesthetics for Narrative Structure extends the understanding of Post-production methods, procedures and technologies. It introduces you to the dynamic and creative roles involved in the Post-production stage of the filmmaking process in defining the final outcome of a production work through digital editing procedures, using an appropriate range of software applications and hardware tools. These roles include the director, offline editor, online editor, colourist, compositor, visual effects supervisor, motion graphic designer, sound editor, surround sound mixer, and motion graphics editor. You will have direct experience in each of the areas covered as you rotate between roles, whilst participating in the group assignments. You will edit rushes from a film in order to maximise the dramatic flow and impact of the scene within the film.

Critical Film Studies: Narrative in Film (20 CU)  
The first half of this module focuses on the study of classical narrative cinema and its popular genres, by providing an overview of the major cinematic works and directors from the early stages to the present. It traces the history of Hollywood cinema in an attempt to understand the formal and stylistic techniques used in main productions, and the influence of the film industry on the development of these particular modes of production. The second half of the module proceeds to explore and analyse other forms of narratives, such as the art cinema narration as well as works considered as non-fiction. This will provide a foundation for the studio practice modules for this half of the semester, by comparing different approaches to development of filmmaking, following the breadth of historical background covered in Semester 1. In addition, you are further exposed to the needs and requirements of academic study, research and writing.

Curriculum Screening for Narrative in Film
The subject specific teaching from both Film Practice Modules and the Critical Film Studies Module will be expanded further by a second series of weekly curriculum screenings. These same films will be subjected to critical analysis in terms of relevance and application with regards to narrative in film and practical background of narrative in film, be it screenwriting (genesis of a project, script analysis, narrative structure), directing (directorial choices, directing actors), production (the film making process, production value), or aesthetic choices of cinematography, editing or sound design, or music and production design.

Tutorial on Writing about Narrative in Film
In addition to the core classes of Critical Film Studies in Narrative in Film, a tutorial is dedicated, in part, to the analysis of the narrative structure of some of the required film viewings with more in-depth analysis of specific key materials of these films.

You will also be expected to evaluate the production values, film techniques and styles employed in Narrative in Film and write on the dialectic logic and effectiveness of evident fundamentals and principles. You will also be required to make insightful observations on the different aspects of the Narrative in Film that permeated and penetrated other cinemas, transcending cartographic and cultural impacts.

Personal and Professional Development 2
You are expected to occasionally meet up with your tutors to discuss your favourite directors and their approaches to filmmaking. This is to help you begin to better understand the concept of genre and auteur. It would help you to develop a keen eye for style and awareness of the approaches and methods to storytelling which are comfortable to your own practice.

Level 2

You will develop the practical and academic work begun in the previous level, and take the collaborative process of film practice further through various exercises and a short film project. You will also have the option to undertake a semester of overseas student exchange to gain a global perspective and enrich your learning experience.

Film Practice I: Screenwriting, Directing and Producing — Collaboration (20 CU)
The collaborative nature of filmmaking practised at Level 1, will now be incrementally expanded into the realm of industry level professionalism. Your progress will be closely monitored throughout the semester. You will learn how to collaborate more effectively in order to create a viable product. The roles and responsibilities of the screenwriter, director and producer as key initiators of any film project will be accurately addressed in the different collaborative exercises initiated in this module. However these will be extended to the other practice module, so as to include also the role of the director of photography in realising a film in accordance with the intentions of the screenwriter, director and producer, while exploring the photographic aspects of the shot and related areas such as sound, lighting, camera operation, scenery, costumes and equipment.

This applies also to the role of the sound designer, which extends from the collaboration with the abovementioned key initiators of film projects, to the delivery of the final product by the editor. This is also the final stage of the storytelling – and/or the person responsible for the Post-production.

In the module component of Screenwriting, Screenwriting for the Short Film Format, you will be asked to generate stories for a short film project. You will go through the specific process of script development of a short film (more specifically, screenplay and scene structure, dilemma and conflict, forces of antagonism, characterisation, character as story and the use of archetypes). You will also be introduced to market and audience sensibilities, so as to better prepare your story for a global audience. In this respect, you will be further familiarised with both linear and non-linear storytelling.

In the module component of Directing at Level 2, classes deal in a practical and comprehensive way with the artistic identity of the Director, to help define the approach of a director from the medium to the subject matter, ranging from the director’s screen grammar, point of view, form and style. It goes into detail over the process the director takes artistic responsibility for, from pre-production (interpreting the script) to production (mise en scene) and post-production (editing principles, working with a composer and the final cut with sound mix), and clarifies the role of the director in this intensive collaborative process.

In the module component of Producing, the Creative Film Production will prepare you for a precise methodology of breaking down a Short Film Script (scenes, shots, pages and characters, locations and days and equipment list) and develop a clear overview of Production Management (detailed budgeting, requesting supplier quotes, budget management, location scouting and permits, casting of talents, management and responsibilities on set). Creative Film Production will instruct you in pitching to a panel and writing a proposal. Defining the key concepts of a film project will lead you to start to conceive professionally ‘The Film Production File’ including the shooting schedule and call sheets. Health & Safety and Location Assessments and Correspondences with suppliers or official letters from government agencies will conclude this important component. This file is, again from the Producer’s point of view, the assembly working tool of your involvement in the collaborative process of filmmaking. The Budgeting Exercises and The Film Production File for the Short Film Project are fully integrated.

Finally, in the group critique sessions, you will undertake another individual research by portfolio project, called Student Portfolio Project 3. You will be tasked to individually prepare one Student Portfolio Project, which will be a short linear/non-linear narrative film project, to be developed freely. The development of this project includes a pitch followed by a treatment or outline for a short feature film, and you will prepare, shoot and edit the small-scale project, by focusing on fundamental and/or common problems in scenes such as one that involves an ‘encounter’. You will be asked to supplement your presentation with a comparative analysis of your individual work, with existing master filmmakers. In addition, you must provide a background of this director’s style, approach, influences and historical context.

Personal and Professional Development 3
You will have occasional/recurrent visits to organisations that are part of the filmmaking process in Singapore, such as editing and post-production houses. You will also have open dialogue sessions with local and regional practitioners like directors, producers, cinematographers and editors, so you are continually in tune with and updated on the latest developments in filmmaking techniques, approaches and styles.

Film Practice II: Cinematography, Sound and Post-production — Collaboration (20 CU)
This module in Semester 1 continues the study of essential elements in professional filmmaking. This module introduces you to the procedures that affect the film as an aesthetic product, and to the artistic and technical potentials related to the image and sound in the professional production and post-production processes. It focuses on key areas of expertise that are involved in staging a screenplay in front of the camera, such as acting, set design and decoration, costumes and props design, lighting and sound design, sound effects and special effects in editing and mastering.

In the module component of Cinematography, you will be exposed to an intermediate coverage of camera operations and techniques. You are expected to perform a number of practical exercises relating to studio and location lighting, scene coverage, composition and camera movements. You will delve into the role of the Cinematographer and gain a comprehensive knowledge in areas of camera functionality, lighting techniques, special effects and creating a style that is appropriate to production.

In the sub-component of Production Design, the Principles of Production Design workshops aim at further developing your ability to recognise, reflect and make informed decisions in creating an appropriate visual philosophy from Level 1.

In the module component of Sound, the Studio Sound Recording and Special Sound Techniques will have a heightened acknowledgement that the practice of film sound is increasingly emphasised as a leading aspect in the filmmaking process. Narrative techniques demand more from the medium of film, requiring an intensified use of narration and dialogue, sound effects, music and space context.

In the Augmenting the Sound component, a Seminar on Film Score is where a further step into using music for film is developed in the proper scoring or composing for film (original music for film, including studio recording and mixing). This will prepare you for the use of music and original soundtrack in the Group Short Film Project in Semester 1.

In the module component of Post-production, Mastering and Post-Production will scrutinise the collaborative process which culminates in the final use of picture editing, conforming, compositing and credits for the purpose of the mastering of both the group and individual projects of this semester. All the projects, to be edited on an individual basis, progressively challenge you to devise a structure and aesthetic sensibility unique to each assignment. Advanced technical skills such as multi-camera editing and composition will also be covered.

Workshop Portfolio Project 2
Visual Storytelling, once again, makes a clear emphasis on the collaborative process, by interpreting the story, interacting with the director and adding appropriate value for the creative producer in this research-based, student-led project developed under the supervision of lecturers. You will research on aesthetic principles in achieving appropriate narrative outcome. You will also be required to enhance and expand your storytelling skills by adapting existing scripts and interpreting and translating them into film. Film continuity through camera and light is also an integral part of the Workshop Portfolio Project.

Critical Film Studies: Film Form (20 CU)
This module progressively introduces you to the making of, and viewing of film as an art. It develops your articulation of film text, delineating film aesthetics as the principle area of study with primary focus on language, semiotics and dialectic components of film. Through continuing studies in these components, you are able to develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between artistic and conceptual concerns with relevance to film practice.

You will compare the classic statements on the aesthetics of filmmaking with contemporary cinematic practice.  From a critical review of key positions and approaches in film studies such as formalism and realism, you will analyse how film as art is relatable to the collaborative aspect of filmmaking. This module further continues to develop the required skills in academic study, research and writing.

Curriculum Screening for Film Form will be extended by a third series of weekly curriculum screenings. These same films will be subjected to critical analysis in terms of relevance and application with regards to theoretical background – Film Form – as well from a practical background – the Collaborative Process, and how this process influences the form, be it from a screenwriting perspective (the genesis of the subject for the story, improvisations, true stories and how to manipulate them, how story generates style), a directing perspective (directorial choices, style versus story), production (the filmmaking process, aesthetic value versus production value), or from all the aesthetic choices of cinematography, editing or sound design, music and film production design, and their direct impact on the formal aspects of the films.

In the Tutorial on Writing about Film Form, you are expected to articulate your understanding of cinematic principle and ideogram. Critiques on film language, structure, treatment and montage theory will provide you with a more intrinsic understanding of how theoretical interventions, visual treatment and aesthetics are collaborative by nature, especially with respect to production and practical application to the process of filmmaking.

Film Practice I: Screenwriting, Directing and Producing — Development of the Short Film Project (20 CU)
This module provides you with the opportunity to develop and realise a Group Short Film Project. You are expected to work collaboratively in production teams. You will define the project with advice from and under the supervision of the respective lecturer/supervisor, conduct relevant research, organise the entire process of the project and finish the project within the allocated timeframe and resources. You are required to take responsibility for at least one key role in the production team. Each discipline has a dedicated lecturer who will conduct the ‘Development Tutorials’ of the specific discipline. You will participate in all the development tutorials, project by project. In this module, areas of the key-initiators of the film projects will be covered.

In the module component of Screenwriting, Development Writing for Group Short Film Project is a workshop where you work intensively on the development of the chosen projects from the previous semester. Weekly sessions are organised to assess the works-in-progress of the developing screenplays. The Writing Development Tutorial, on the other hand, provides the possibility for the groups to meet up, project by project, with the lecturer/supervisor for subject-specific advice and consultancy for the development of the screenplay for the Group Short Film Project.

In the module component of Directing, Directing for Group Short Film Project is where you work intensively in a group on the chosen diploma projects by developing the film parameters, in the process from script to screen. Additional topics at stake for this development are treated in a comparative analysis with directorial choices from existing films. Weekly sessions are organised to assess the improvements of the development in full-size class sessions. The Directing Development Tutorial, on the other hand, provides the possibility for the groups to meet up, project by project, with the lecturer/supervisor, for subject specific advice and consultancy for the development of the Group Short Film Project.

In the module component of Producing, The Business of Film enhances the understanding of filmmaking as an artistic and communicative process. It focuses on the particular skills and techniques involved in developing and managing a production project within limited resources in a professional context.  Through a range of practical sessions that incorporate expertise from arts management practice, you are introduced to the diverse areas of a complex cinematic project, such as the Group Short Film Project. It also emphasises the importance of commercial aspects of film productions in areas such as production planning, budgeting, distribution and legal affairs. Industry-standard scheduling and budgeting software is used during the course. The outcome leads straight to the compilation of a professional Film Production File that is to be submitted for funding by the Singapore Film Commission. In fact, the Film Production Development Tutorial provides the possibility for each group, working on a Short Film Project to meet up with the lecturer for subject-specific advice and consultancy for the development of the professional Film Production File for the Group Short Film Project.

A short session, Seminar – The Singapore Film Commission, is scheduled to introduce you to the core business of this government body, and to familiarise you with all the funding schemes in place. Another session, Seminar – Media Law, introduces you to the detailed legal matters of releases, terms and contracts, and specifically the protection of intellectual property in regards to film and media production. Finally, Seminar – Marketing & Exhibition (Promotion and Distribution), prepares you for the important link to explore and define how and when to bring the project to the global audience.

In this semester, Student Portfolio Project 4 takes on a research and reflective approach, and will culminate in the documentary form. As previously ingrained, the development of this project includes a treatment or outline for a short documentary film, and you will prepare, shoot and edit the individual film project, by concentrating exclusively on one research topic in relation to the brief provided. You will be asked to supplement your presentation with a comparative analysis of your specific work representing the process undertaken in developing your short film. In addition, you must provide a background of the style, approach, influences and historical context. This will be done in a group critique context.

Interdisciplinary Project 
Interdisciplinarity is a key principle of a LASALLE arts education. Exploration of interdisciplinarity in your creative practice will provide you with the platform to work across disciplinary boundaries and explore new ways of developing ideas, concepts and practices.

In this module, you will be required to undertake an interdisciplinary project. You will have the opportunity to work with team members from different programmes and disciplines on a common project brief. As a team, you will learn to integrate knowledge and skills from various disciplines to produce new insights and/or outcomes.

Film Practice II: Cinematography, Sound and Post-production — Development of the Short Film Project (20 CU)
This module  provides you with the opportunity to develop and realise a Group Short Film Project. You are expected to work collaboratively in production teams. Each student will take responsibility for at least one key role in the production team. Each discipline has a respective lecturer who will conduct the ‘Development Tutorials’ of the specific discipline. You will participate in all the development tutorials, project by project.

In preparation for the Group Short Film Project, Workshop Portfolio Project 3: Blocking – Actor & Camera will prepare and equip you to work closely with your cast to achieve the most out of performance for the screen. As autonomous learners, you will persist in the tradition of inquiry in preparing the production of these workshop portfolio projects, while being supervised by lecturers. By collaborating with talent outside of the Puttnam School of Film, from the Faculty of Performing Arts for example, you will learn to communicate with actors, and even acquire basic acting skills yourself.

In the module component of Cinematography, Cinematography for the Short Film Project, you work intensively on the cinematographic approach of the chosen diploma projects. Both on location and in studio, camera accessories and specific lighting techniques and/or filters are experimented with a short Advanced Camera and Lighting exercise, and serve as an ultimate try-out for the chosen Group Short Film Project. Additional topics at stake for use of camera and light are treated in a comparative analysis with existing films of Master Directors of Photography. Weekly sessions are organised to assess the evolution in the preparatory breakdowns of shots of the written shooting scripts in class.

The Cinematography Development Tutorial provides the possibility for student production teams to meet up with the lecturer/supervisor for subject-specific advice and consultancy for the development of the Group Short Film Project, in terms of camera and light.

In the sub-component of Production Design, you will have a more hands-on approach in tackling your specific Group Short Film Project. Classes will be organised as consultation to tailor to distinct queries with regards to set and/or on-location production. You will also deepen your understanding of the design process involved in taking a project from page to screen.

In the module component of Sound, Sound Design and Music for the Short Film Project is where you work intensively on the overall sound design of the chosen projects. This will include the choice of existing and/or original music for the films. Additional topics that could be covered would include, but are not limited to, the specific use of sound on location, in studio, or in special effects, and are treated in a comparative analysis with existing films of Masters of Sound Design and Music. Weekly sessions are organised to assess the enhancement and evolution of the works-in-progress of the sound design and music in class.

The Sound Development Tutorial provides the possibility for the student production team to meet up, project by project, with the lecturer/supervisor for subject-specific advice and consultancy for the development of the Sound Design and Music of the Short Film Project.

Finally, in the module component of Post-production, Mastering and Post Production for the Group Short Film Project, you will work intensively on the Editing and Post-production Processes, Workflows, and organisation of the chosen projects. Additional topics, central to the specific preparation of visual effects during shooting and integrating these effects in the final Post-production process are treated in a comparative analysis with existing films, by Master Editors. Weekly sessions are organised to assess the improvements of the preparation for the editing and post-production process. This happens in full-size class sessions.

Post-production Development Tutorial provides the possibility for a student production team to meet up, project by project, with the lecturer/supervisor for subject-specific advice and consultancy for the development of the Editing Plan and the post-production process for the Short Film Project.

In addition, Seminar on New Workflows will give you the opportunity to be updated on the new developments and workflows in production and post-production. Seminar on Authoring A Showreel will prepare you for creating marketing materials to promote yourself and your works to the industry. Last but not least, in order to introduce you to the specifics of Advertising Film Production, which will be organised for you in Level 3 (FHEQ Level 6), introductory seminars relating to this field of study will be held.

Critical Film Studies: Issues in Film (20 CU)
This module further exposes you to the components of Critical Film Studies. Through continuing studies in these components, you are increasingly able to develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between conceptual concerns and practice. It will focus particularly on issues that change and influence today’s cinema. This unit provides a detailed study on how social and political concerns affect the look, language, content, audience perception and reception of cinema today.

Curriculum Screening for Issues in Film will be expounded further by a fourth series of weekly curriculum screenings. These same films will be subjected to critical analysis in terms of relevance and application with regards to theoretical background – Issues in Film – as well from a practical background – the Collaborative Process, be it from a screenwriting perspective (the genesis of the subject for the story, improvisations, true stories manipulated for film, adaptations from classics, portraits, epics), a directing perspective (very pronounced directorial choices, directing a specific choice of actors, e.g. non-professionals versus professionals, search for authenticity versus artistic freedom), production (the filmmaking process creating small or big production value, the process versus success at the box office), or strong aesthetic choices of cinematography, editing or sound design, music and film production design.

Tutorial on Writing about Issues in Film discussions on cinematic movements and their influences from and on social and political issues will lead to written reflections on your position and points of view on presented topical studies.

Personal and Professional Development 4
You will start a journal on the genre/type of story you are instinctively drawn to making. You will be encouraged to start a script you would like to develop. You are not required to finish the script, but encouraged to start visiting themes and subject matters that you are keen to develop into a story. This inculcates and nurtures your affinity for intrinsic storytelling.

Student Exchange Elective (60 CU)
This module gives you the opportunity to explore fresh perspectives and alternative approaches to your creative discipline, by undertaking a semester-long international learning exchange in another institution. The aim of the module is to provide interested students an opportunity to enrich their learning journey, enhance their creative practice, learn from a socio-culturally different educational setting, and be exposed to new cultural and creative industries.

Please note that this is an elective module. Students who undertake this module will not be required to take additional modules.

In this module, you will spend a semester studying in a cognate programme or a selection of relevant modules at one of LASALLE’s partner institutions. You will also be expected to be an independent learner to relate and integrate the experience, knowledge and skills acquired to the assessments required for this module. Through this international experience, you will be able to strengthen your ability to adapt and react to changing trends and environment. You will build your capacity to contribute effectively as an active and informed local and global citizen, while broadening your network and enhancing your career prospects in the arts and creative industries. 

You are responsible for applying to this elective option through the College’s Division of Quality and Planning (Email: global_engagement@lasalle.edu.sg) before Week 7 of Semester 1 . 

Your application for this elective module must be supported by your Programme Leader. You are expected to adhere to the regulations, guidelines and planned curriculum issued by the host institution. At the same time, you are expected to regularly update your assigned lecturer on the progress of your learning at the partner institution, and also seek guidance on the completion of the units of assessment for this module.

Level 3

You will focus on the complex demands of professional filmmaking. Work undertaken in the final year combines your developed artistic approach and technical skills, culminating in a Thesis Film where you will select two areas of focus. You will also have the opportunity to undertake internships and/or industry and community projects.

Industry and Community Engagement (20 CU)
This module is designed to enable you to broaden your knowledge of the cultural and creative industries by placing you, as a learning professional, within a professional work environment. The aim of the module is to help you develop work-related knowledge, skills and capabilities, prepare you to pursue opportunities in fields relating to your study, and expose you to a diverse set of professional trajectories. You will map your acquired skills, interests and aspirations against current (and future) opportunities in the cultural and creative industries, while putting to practice skills and knowledge gained in the classroom. You are required to attend various industry preparation workshops, such as resume-writing, interview skills, and etc., as part of this module.

In fulfilment of this module, you can choose one of the following options: 

Option A: Industry-based Internship(s)
You will independently source and apply for internship opportunities. You are required to identify your interest and career-trajectory. These opportunities should be in an organisation where the job functions are related to your discipline. 

The internship may be with a single organisation or an accumulation of short-term work with different companies, to accumulate the minimum 200 hours of on-the-job training. The internship may be spread across a number of days/weeks and need not be a full-time position. Where possible, you are encouraged to go beyond the minimum hours in order to showcase your talent and abilities, which will aid your quest for permanent employment and/or gain more opportunities to learn about the job and industry. 

All internships must be approved by the Programme Leader, prior to commencement, to align with learning aims and outcomes. 

Option B: Negotiated Projects 
You will take a proactive and entrepreneurial approach to identify and create a niche for yourself, within the cultural and creative industries. You may undertake a combination of the following types of projects:

  • Industry Live Project: You can source for an industry project, or this can be facilitated through the programme.
  • Entrepreneurial Project: You may devise a business proposal and execute it. 
  • Community Engagement Project: You can engage with a community of your preference, and develop and execute an initiative for them. 
  • Short-term internship (about 100 hours)

To ensure that you fulfil the learning outcomes of this module, all proposals and short-term internship opportunities must be discussed and approved by the Programme Leader.

Dissertation (40 CU)
This module is the culmination of the research and contextual knowledge that you have acquired during the course of your study. You will be required to undertake in-depth critical research, and present a coherent argument based on investigation and analysis. The chosen topic will be relevant to your main course of study, and will be used to support and inform your specialist practice. It will demonstrate your deep appreciation of your field, and competency of key approaches and methodologies to contextualise it.

You will demonstrate an ability to identify a research topic that is close to your practice or field of study through a clear literature review, and present relevant arguments and hypotheses in the written form of between 6,000 to 8,000 words.

Before commencing your dissertation, you will be required to develop a research proposal outline to demonstrate your research question and approach to completing the dissertation. In consultation with your supervisor, you may form your dissertation around an exegesis that foregrounds your major creative studio practice. Programmes where you are eligible to develop a piece of creative practice as part of your dissertation may be negotiated with your supervisor. In this instance, the word count for the written element may be negotiated, but a minimum word count of 4,000 words is required.

You are expected to undertake a significant amount of independent and self-motivated research. You will be assigned a supervisor who will provide guidance in your research work. You will also be required to attend all dissertation-related classes.

Graduation Project (60 CU)
This module represents the culmination of the three-year learning journey. It provides you with the opportunity to showcase the knowledge and skills you have acquired in the form of a thesis film. The film aims to demonstrate development and sophistication in creative practice and technical ability, as well as critical maturity. Examples may include:

  • A short fiction film produced collaboratively, whereby you fulfil a clearly delineated major role such as screenwriter, producer, director, cinematographer, sound recordist, editor, production designer, etc.
  • A short independently produced documentary, whereby small groups of students fulfil multiple roles.
  • An experimental film-related project produced independently, or in collaboration with students from another discipline such as Animation, Fashion, Fine Arts, etc.

In Semester 1, you will spend time conceptualising and preparing for the thesis film, through development tutorials/workshops in the following areas:

  • Screenwriting
  • Directing
  • Producing
  • Cinematography
  • Post-production (Editing & Colour Grading)
  • Sound Recording & Sound Post-production
  • Production Design
  • Documentary Production

While you will adopt a primary role in one thesis film project, you will also be expected to significantly contribute to a second thesis film in a supporting role, in order to broaden your overall learning experience. Therefore, you are required to select two of the development tutorials/workshops listed above. You are welcome to attend more than two, subject to availability.

In Semester 2, you will primarily be engaged in production and post-production of your graduation projects, while also attending frequent feedback sessions with your respective supervisors.

More Information

Learning methods

You will have opportunities to work in studios and attend special workshops and masterclasses. You will attend lectures, tutorials, seminars and screenings. You will participate in class presentations and complete written assignments. You will be assessed at the end of every semester on your studio practice.

Assessment and course materials

Assessment is an integral part of the learning process and will be formative and diagnostic, as well as summative and evaluative. Feedback to students is provided, wherever appropriate.
 

Download assessment overview PDF  

Internship

You will independently source and apply for internship opportunities. You are required to identify your interest and career trajectory. These opportunities should be in an organisation where the job functions are related to your discipline. 

The internship may be with a single organisation or an accumulation of short-term work with different companies, to accumulate the minimum 200 hours of on-the-job training. The internship may be spread across a number of days/weeks and need not be a full-time position. Where possible, you are encouraged to go beyond the minimum hours in order to showcase your talent and abilities, which will aid your quest for permanent employment and/or gain more opportunities to learn about the job and industry. 

All internships must be approved by the Programme Leader, prior to commencement, to align with learning aims and outcomes.

Programme completion criteria

Students need to accumulate 360 credits from Levels 1 (FHEQ 4), 2 (FHEQ 5) and 3 (FHEQ 6).

Student exchange

LASALLE is committed to providing our students with an international perspective and nurturing them to be global citizens. The opportunity for student exchanges will broaden your network and strengthen your ability to adapt and react to the global changing trends and environment.

“Wonderful. I met a lot of people I am still friends with. I really loved the lectures. The equipment and building are very good. I came to be exposed to another culture and I wasn't disappointed, since Singapore and LASALLE are so multicultural.” 
Exchange student, Pauline Marie Estelle Perrin, from Design Academy Eindhoven

"There are so many international students in LASALLE, thus I learned various design philosophies from them." 
Exchange student, Suzuko Asawa, from Tokyo University of the Arts

Outgoing Exchanges
Students enrolled in our BA(Hons) degree programmes will have the opportunity to go on a semester of overseas exchange with our selected partner institutions. The Student Exchange Elective module (60 credits) is an option for BA(Hons) degree students in Level 2, Semester 2. For more details on the eligibility criteria and the application process, please login to the Learning Portal. For more information or assistance, please email us.  

Incoming Exchanges
LASALLE welcomes reciprocal student exchanges from our partner institutions. Students in our partner institutions can identify a cognate programme from our list of 13 BA(Hons) degree programmes and join us for a semester. Please refer to our academic calendar here.

Deadlines for Incoming Exchange Applications
15 May – Semester 1 intake
15 October – Semester 2 intake

Eligibility
You will need to be an enrolled student from one of our partner institutions. As English is our language of instruction, incoming exchange students from a non-English medium partner institution are expected to have IELTS 6.0 or TOEFL (PBT 550 / CBT 213 / IBT80).

Please fill up our online incoming exchange student form here. You will be contacted by our staff regarding more details on the application process. For more information or assistance, please email us. You may refer to our International Student Guide for information about visa application, accommodation and the expenses for living in Singapore.

Career paths

Make an impact as:
Screenwriter, Producer, Fiction or Documentary Director, Cinematographer, Editor, Sound Designer or Production Designer.

HighLights

  • Awards
  • News & Events
  • Star Alumni
  • Features
  • Industry Collaborations
  • International Partnerships
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Academics

Tap into the illustrious minds of our faculty members who are movers and shakers in their own disciplines. They will impart, challenge and encourage, as they share their invaluable expertise and experiences with you.

Dean, Faculty of Fine Arts, Media & Creative Industries
Head, Puttnam School of Film & Animation
Programme Leader, Diploma in Broadcast Media & BA(Hons) Film
Senior Lecturer, Film
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Admission Information

Important Dates

  • Apply by: 16 November 2018
  • Application outcome will be announced by: 14 December 2018
  • Start of Semester: AY2019/2020

(Local Diploma graduates who apply for BA(Hons) programmes will be advised of their application outcomes in late May 2019).

Entry Requirements

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

Singapore
  • Singapore
  • Australia
  • Brunei
  • China (PRC)
  • European Baccalaureate
  • France
  • Germany
  • Hong Kong
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Japan
  • Malaysia
  • Myanmar
  • New Zealand
  • Philippines
  • ROC, Taiwan
  • Russia
  • South Korea
  • Sri Lanka
  • Thailand
  • United Arab of Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States of America
  • Vietnam
Qualifications Remarks
Singapore-Cambridge GCE A-Level 2 A-Level/H2 subjects and a pass in General Paper
Local Polytechnic -
International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma -

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)
Minimum Requirements for Entry into a BA(Hons) Level 2 Programme

  • A relevant diploma in the field or discipline.
  • Your portfolio or audition must be exceptionally strong and demonstrate prior formal training in the relevant arts discipline. The transcript from your diploma course must demonstrate that you have read and passed the equivalents of essential LASALLE modules.

 


Alternative English Language Qualification

Entry Into IELTS TOEFL
BA(Hons) 6.0 PBT IBT
550 80

ADMISSIONS TESTS/PORTFOLIO AND INTERVIEW REQUIREMENTS

You are requested to present a story, or a treatment for a story, that you would like to make for the screen. The premise of the story is important. 

You will be asked to articulate why you think your story will be appealing, and worthy of being produced as a film. To assist your presentation, you may use still-photographs to reflect the mood, style and form of your end product – the film. 

In addition, you may submit the following as evidence of your pursuit to study film and be able to reflect on these works: 

  • Moving images which may include video clips, music videos, television commercials and corporate videos 
  • Short film as well as school film projects 
  • Moodboards and storyboards 
  • Photographs 
  • Short screenplay, prose or poems 

Do bring along any testimonial statements that state your relevant experience or referral letters, if any. 

What we are looking for? 

We are looking for students who possess commitment, motivation, determination and a passion for storytelling. Your presentation should reflect your dedication to creating stories with universal appeal. Good communication skills and the capacity to work unselfishly in a team are essential. It is not necessary to have made films, although any professional experience and practice in filmmaking will add credibility to your portfolio.

Fees
Components

Tuition Fees (per annum)

BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONS) TUITION FEES FOR AUGUST 2019 INTAKE (PER ANNUM FEES)

Funded (Subsidised Fees) Non-Funded (Full Fees)
Singaporeans Singapore PR Singaporeans Singapore PR International
S$9,728.98 S$13,794.40* S$19,000 S$21,150 S$23,800
Notes:

*SPRs students who choose to take up the Tuition Grant (TG) will need to make an online application and then sign the TG Deed with the Government of Singapore. Under the terms of the Tuition Grant Deed, you will be required to work for a Singapore entity for a period of three years upon graduation. For more information, visit tgonline.moe.gov.sg

  • Funded/Subsidised fees for Singaporeans and Singapore PR qualify for GST Subsidy from MOE, all other fees include 7% GST.
  • Fees are due on the first day of each semester.
  • Fees are subject to change.
  • Correct as at November 2017.
 

Application Fees

A non-refundable application fee (inclusive of 7% GST) is chargeable per application. Application is only complete upon receipt of your application fee and all necessary documents. Please ensure your application fee is paid and documents are submitted within seven working days from the submission date of your online application. LASALLE reserves the right to withdraw the applicant if the application fee remains unpaid and documents are not received by the due date.

Singaporean / Singapore Permanent Resident Applicants International Applicants
S$60.00 S$120.00
 

Additional Costs

Basic materials for learning are provided by the College.

As a developing artist, you are required to have certain items that are personal to you and cannot be shared. Such items include books, dance shoes, rehearsal clothes, safety boots, portable musical instruments, paints, canvas, basic tools, design software, cameras, etc., that will support you through your three-year learning journey. The College does not encourage the purchase of extravagant or costly materials or equipment. Our lecturers can provide you with affordable suggestions.

You are also encouraged to have your own laptop for education. If you do not own one, computer labs are available on campus with requisite software for you to undertake your work.

There may be opportunities for you to undertake extra-curricular study trips to enhance your overall learning. Trips are not compulsory and may incur additional costs.

 

MORE INFORMATION

Fee Protection Scheme (FPS)

Fee Protection Scheme (FPS) serves to protect students’ fees in the event a Private Education Institution (PEI) is unable to continue operations due to insolvency and/or regulatory closure. The FPS also protects students when the PEI fails to pay penalties or refund fees to the students arising from judgements made against it by the Singapore courts.

In seeking to be an EduTrust-certified PEI, LASALLE is required to adopt the FPS to ensure full protection to all fees paid by their students. Therefore, the FPS is compulsory for students who are taking BA(Hons), MA and Certificate programmes at LASALLE.

Diploma programmes offered by LASALLE are exempted from FPS under the EduTrust requirements of the Committee for Private Education (CPE).

More information on the Committee for Private Education

Medical Insurance Scheme (MIS)

All full-time students of LASALLE are required to be covered under the Medical Insurance Scheme (MIS). The annual coverage of S$20,000 includes school-related activities throughout the programme duration.

The current premium rate of S$18.20 is payable each semester. This premium rate is subject to change based on the prevailing premiums charged by the insurer.

Accepted Modes of Payment

All payment to LASALLE must be made in Singapore Dollars. 

Our accepted payment modes include:

  • DBS Online Banking and ATM Transfer
  • GIRO
  • Cheque/ Bank Draft/ Cashier's Order/ Demand Draft
  • NETS
  • Cash
  • Master/ Visa/ China UnionPay
  • Wired Transfer/ Telegraphic Transfer (Only for International students)
Scholarships & Financial Support

SCHOLARSHIPS

In recognition of outstanding academic excellence, leadership potential, and a passion for creativity and innovation, LASALLE offers a variety of scholarships to new and current students.

Applications for scholarships open from March to May for new students. Other externally sponsored scholarships are also available to students. Enquiries and applications may be directed to the respective organisations.

Please note that miscellaneous fees are not covered by scholarships, bursaries or the Mendaki Tertiary Tuition Fee Subsidy (TTFS).

View Scholarships Offered

FINANCIAL SUPPORT

We are committed to providing a quality education for all our students, and believe that no deserving student should be denied admission because of financial difficulty.

A range of financial assistance schemes, grants and loans are made available to help meet a portion of the educational expenses of students.

Applications for financial assistance open from March to May for new students.

Please note that miscellaneous fees are not covered by scholarships, bursaries or the Mendaki Tertiary Tuition Fee Subsidy (TTFS).

View Bursaries Offered

MORE INFORMATION

Frequently Asked Questions

Download Prospectus

Undergraduate Prospectus
Download PDF
Puttnam School of Film & Animation Prospectus
Download PDF
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Take the next exhilarating step with our BA(Hons) Film Programme.