Programmes

BA(HONS)

Music

Be a creative musician well-versed in a repertoire of performance, composition and new music technologies.

This programme has been developed in response to the demands of a growing creative music industry in Singapore and Southeast Asia for graduates with an enhanced ability, knowledge and diversity of experience in the area of performance, composition and new music technologies.

The BA(Hons) Music Programme offers five specialist areas of practice including Classical Performance, Jazz Performance, Popular Music Performance, Composition and Arranging, and Electronic Music. Depending on your specialisation, you will focus on essential technical skills and repertoire specific to your specialisation through weekly lessons on theory and history, one-to-one coaching on composition, and regular performances.

Moreover, there is an emphasis on research throughout the programme, preparing you to be an academically-rigorous and articulate musician. Opportunities also abound for you to collaborate with peers within the five specialisms and across disciplines.

In keeping with the latest industry demands, graduates from the School of Contemporary Music embrace technology as an integral part of their performance and compositional practice. Some of the distinctive features of our programme include the teaching of recording and producing techniques to all students, a pioneering improvisation programme for our Classical Performance stream, and a focus on developing you to be an independent learner and creative musician, ready to enter postgraduate studies or become a leader in the music industry.

You will be mentored by some of the most experienced performers and educators in the region, with opportunities to gain experience as a performer in the theatre venues and the recording studio at the College.

Course Details

Thumbnail
Duration

3 years

Mode

Full Time

Modules
Level 1

You will be Introduced to the basic approaches, methods and skills of the programme. You will develop a strong technical foundation in your instrument or voice, be exposed to a broad range of repertoire, technologies and approaches to music-making, and establish a firm historical context for your specialisation.

Principal Study 1A (15 CU)
This module is a specialised module with two components. Fundamental techniques in instrumental performance, composition and electronic music are delivered in one-to-one lessons for performers, while group lessons are conducted for composers and electronic music specialists. In addition, students in Classical, Jazz, Popular Performance and Electronic Music engage in group lessons on sight reading, while Composition and Arranging students engage in classes on conducting.

Principal Study 1A introduces the technical skills required for performing, composing and programming software within your specialisation, together with developing the ability to engage in focussed and productive self-directed practice. Performers are given an awareness and understanding of the technical requirements involved in playing their chosen instrument or in singing, while being introduced to important repertoires for their instrument within their chosen specialism. Composers are introduced to the fundamentals of harmony and counterpoint, arranging and composing idiomatically for instruments, and developing knowledge of form and style. Electronic Music specialists are introduced to the technical operations of various computer software for creative musical tasks including composing, performing and synthesising sound.

You are recommended to engage in an appropriate amount of self-directed individual practice/composition/programming per week based on the tasks set by the Principal Study teacher and in preparation for your Principal Study 1A technical exam or folio presentation held at the end of the semester. This self-directed practice is to be documented in a reflective journal. The journal should focus on your learning processes, document progress and challenges, skills learnt in the Principal Study lesson, and their application to music-making situations.

In addition, as a fundamental skill set of Principal Study 1A, sight reading and conducting are also delivered as part of this module, establishing the ability to read at sight and conduct repertoires important to your specialism.

  • Classical Performance Specialisation

Physical dexterity and control of the instrument or voice is the primary focus in Principal Study 1A of the classical specialisation, with a technical exam comprising appropriate technical exercises chosen by the Principal Study teacher to be performed at the conclusion of the semester. Throughout the semester, you are introduced to important foundational repertoire on your instrument ranging from the Baroque to the 20th Century that is technically demanding for the level of study. In addition, you will engage in group sight-reading classes and establish a foundation in reading at sight repertoire stylistically appropriate to your specialisation, culminating in an exam at the end of the semester.

  • Jazz Performance Specialisation

Physical dexterity and control of the instrument or voice is the primary focus in Principal Study 1A of the jazz specialisation with a technical exam comprising appropriate technical exercises undertaken at the conclusion of the semester. Throughout the semester, you are introduced to significant jazz repertoire for your instrument/voice, with an emphasis on foundational popular forms and standard repertoire for jazz improvisation that are technically demanding for the level of study.  In addition, you will engage in group sight-reading classes and establish a foundation in a reading-at-sight repertoire stylistically appropriate to your specialisation, culminating in an exam at the end of the semester.

  • Popular Music Performance Specialisation

Physical dexterity and control of the instrument or voice is the primary focus in Principal Study 1A of the Popular Music specialisation with a technical exam comprising appropriate scales, etudes and technical exercises to be performed at the conclusion of the semester. Throughout the semester, you are introduced to significant popular music repertoire for your instrument/voice that is technically demanding for the level of study. In addition, you will engage in group sight-reading classes and establish a foundation in reading at sight repertoire stylistically appropriate to your specialisation.

  • Composition and Arranging Specialisation

Principal Study 1A in Composition and Arranging focuses on developing the fundamentals of harmony and counterpoint as well as orchestration techniques. These are delivered in a group class. Structured projects creating a foundation for composing idiomatically for instruments and developing knowledge of form and style are delivered throughout the semester, culminating in a folio presentation at the conclusion of the semester. In addition, you will engage in conducting lessons covering the fundamentals of interpreting and conducting foundational repertoire and your own compositions, culminating in an exam at the end of the semester.

  • Electronic Music Specialisation

Principal Study 1A introduces Electronic Music students to the technical and creative possibilities available in a computer-based audio production environment, such as music production, composing and performance. The use of industry standard digital audio workstations provide the platform in which you engage with technical and aesthetic issues in digital audio and MIDI production. Throughout the course, you are taught foundational knowledge in the technical aspects of digital audio, synchronisation, MIDI and the functions of creative software throughout the course. In addition, Electronic Music students engage in group score-reading classes to establish a foundation in reading and interpreting various musical notations stylistically, culminating in an exam at the end of semester.

Ensemble Workshop 1A (15 CU)
This module comprises three components made up of Specialised Ensemble (specialised), Performance Workshop (specialised) and Creative Music Ensemble (combined), and introduces you to ensemble skills including the ability to perform effectively as part of a group, improvisation techniques, presentation skills, and how to communicate musical intentions clearly to an audience and each other.

Specialised Ensembles
You will rehearse contemporary repertoire and foundation skills in improvisation significant to your specialisation, alongside original student works, and perform these pieces within your specialised performance workshop.

  • Classical Performance Specialisation

This component introduces improvisation concepts within the Classical music tradition. You are introduced to applying techniques to improvisational contexts including intervals, major and minor scales, chords, chord progressions, non-chord tones, meter, rhythms, syncopation, sequence, phrase, motif development, modulation to closely related keys, including binary and ternary forms.

  • Composition and Arranging Specialisation

This component introduces you to ensemble awareness in key areas such as balance, dynamics, tempo cohesion and style interpretation. You will attend gamelan ensemble class on a weekly basis, and be introduced to gamelan repertoire and the different instruments that constitute the gamelan. This component introduces composers to the performative aspects of gamelan music, which can be applied to your compositions.

  • Jazz Performance/Popular Music Performance Specialisation

This component introduces you to ensemble skills and collective music-making. You will attend ensemble classes on a weekly basis with a small pop group/jazz combo supervised by a member of staff. These groups work towards a thorough understanding of a wide range of standard repertoire and compositional techniques unique to your specialisation.

  • Electronic Music Specialisation

This component introduces you to ensemble skills and collective music-making in the Electronic Music specialisation. You will attend ensemble classes on a weekly basis and, through instructor-led projects, investigate areas of research in live performance utilising methods including original instrument building, circuit bending, interactive composition, and electro-acoustic composition and improvisation. The class introduces methods on how to develop ideas in a collective and directed process for performance in the Electronic Music Performance Workshop. The purpose of the class is to focus on innovative techniques, and the unique and challenging aspects of playing in an electronic ensemble, such as ensemble balance, listening to each other and cohesive improvising.

Performance Workshop
Workshop classes are specialised and concentrate on the unique stylistic, performative qualities and processes of each specialisation. Lecturer and student feedback and critique of each other’s work during performance workshop is a critical element to this component.

  • Classical Performance Specialisation

Classical music performance workshop allows classical students from all year levels to present solo or ensemble work as a part of the class, in keeping with the specific repertoire and performance practice unique to this specialisation. A concentration on the fundamental repertoire of classical music performance forms the basis of this class.

  • Jazz/Popular Music Performance Specialisation

Jazz and Popular Music performance workshops will see students (in separate classes) perform. They will be critiqued by staff and fellow students from all year levels each week. These sessions cover areas including group performance awareness, balance, cohesion and the interpretation of specific repertoire unique to the two specialisations. For instance, jazz students will be critiqued on their ability to perform and improvise with repertoire based on the Jazz tradition. Pop musicians will also be required to perform repertoire that is stylistically correct from the pop music tradition.

  • Composition and Arranging Specialisation

Composition and Arranging workshop is a class that enables composer specialists from all year levels to present their work and have it critiqued by their peers. The class is also an opportunity for lecturers to present their own work and discuss the work of other significant 20th Century and new millennium composers.

  • Electronic Music Specialisation

Electronic Music workshop is a class that enables Electronic Music specialists to present works-in-progress introduced in Specialised Ensemble, to be critiqued by lecturers and peers from all levels within the specialisation.

Common Component

  • Creative Music Ensemble

In addition to you working in streamed ensembles, this module requires you to participate in a cross-specialisation ensemble. This ensemble icludes a weekly class to perform, and workshops that explore collective music-making across the five specialisations in Level 1. The creative music ensemble is a concept-driven class that introduces you to a broad spectrum of approaches found in the 20th and early 21st centuries, including graphic scores, improvisation, electro-acoustic music and the relationship between ‘noise’ and music.

Music Skills and Technology 1A (15 CU)
This module is a specialist and common one that covers foundation skills for contemporary musicians, with a focus on understanding traditional music notation and technology applied to musical contexts. It is made up of components in Music Theory, Aural Training, Keyboard Skills, Sound Reinforcement and Digital Music Production. The Theory and Aural components are specialised and delivered to Classical Performance, as well as Composition and Arranging students in one class, while Jazz, Popular Performance and Electronic Music are delivered in the other class. These components introduce methods to recognise and analyse by sight and by ear essential components of musical language, such as form, harmony, musical intervals, rhythms, motifs, modes, metres and timbre. To support, and enhance your understanding of the concepts introduced in Music Theory and Aural Training, a component in Keyboard Skills is delivered to each specialisation. In addition, Sound Reinforcement is delivered as a combined class for Classical, Composition and Arranging, Jazz and Popular Performance students, while Electronic Music students receive a specialised class. Similarly, Performance and Composition students receive combined classes introducing Digital Music Production, while Electronic Music Students receive specialised classes in Music Production.

Music Theory 1
Classical Performance/Composition and Arranging Specialisations
Classical Theory introduces you to the theoretical tools used to analyse and understand Western classical repertoire from the ‘Common Practice Period’ (Tonal Harmony). It progressively introduces concepts in the organisation of tonal material through the analysis of exemplar works from the common period. Classical performers are also encouraged to seek out examples from their performance repertoire and composers are advised to study their original compositions to emphasise the connection between theory and practice.

• Jazz Performance/Popular Music/Electronic Music Specialisations
Theory for Jazz and Popular music takes into account their shared theoretical practices. It is an introductory class covering the foundations of harmony, analysis and musical theory within popular and jazz music. The learning of song forms, standard harmonic structures and orchestration will provide you with the framework needed to perform standard repertoire with a deeper understanding, and give you a stable foundation in which to compose your own music – a requisite increasingly emphasised throughout the BA(Hons) Music Programme for Jazz and Popular Music students. Music Theory in the context of Electronic Music provides the basis for you to understand music in the context of a recording situation as producers, and also provides you with the tools to compose your own music in traditional forms. 

Aural Training 1
An introduction to methods in recognising, analysing and repeating sounds by ear is the focus of this component. These classes are delivered similarly to Music Theory in that Classical and Composition and Arranging students attend specialised classes focussing on Classical applications, while Jazz, Popular Music and Electronic Music students attend classes focussing on Jazz and Popular music applications of Aural Training. The subject introduces methodologies of Aural awareness through sequentially graded exercises in SOLFEG singing (relative pitch development), interval recognition, melodic and rhythmic transcription, sight singing and chord and scale recognition.

Keyboard Skills
Keyboard Skills is a genre-specific class delivered to keyboard players and non-keyboard players in specialised classes and is also genre specific. Non-keyboard specialists and Composition and Arranging students are introduced to methodologies for understanding the basic technique and geography of the keyboard, including an introduction to chord voicings, interpreting ‘lead sheets’ and relevant scales and melodic patterns used within functional harmony. Keyboard Skills for Classical Piano students is a class to enhance and develop their fundamental training on the instrument and to engage in practices such as principles of ornamentation, pedalling, and phrasing with particular emphasis on idiosyncrasies characteristic of various musical styles. Similarly, Jazz and Popular Music Keyboard specialists will enhance their basic technical foundation in this component along with developing voicings and accompanying techniques for soloists and vocalists within the context of a rhythm section.

Sound Reinforcement 1
The sound reinforcement component is undertaken by all specialisations. You are introduced to a range of equipment for amplifying sound and are introduced to the idea of signal flow and acoustics. Through the course, you are enabled to reflect critically in order to evaluate within these technologically mediated contexts. In this course, you encounter the challenges of working with sound in different contexts – particularly in the technical and aesthetic aspects of live sound for performance – and engage in the process of finding practical solutions to these challenges, through the study of acoustics, sonic properties and modern audio equipment.

Introduction to Digital Music Production 1
• Classical, Jazz & Popular Music Performance, Composition and Arranging Specialisations
Introduction to Digital Music Production introduces you to the basic technologies and working methodologies of digital music production. During the course, you learn the basics of computer-based music, covering various industry standard music software and computer-based music composition techniques. An introductory understanding of digital audio and MIDI concepts is achieved through a series of practice-based exercises and projects.

Music Production 1
• Electronic Music Specialisation
The Music Production component for Electronic Music specialists introduces you to the music production process and develops a familiarity with recording equipment, software and its nomenclature. You gain experience in the usage of an appropriate range of equipment, such as microphones, signal processors, mixing desks, stereo and multi-track recorders, and monitoring systems. Music Production provides Electronic Music students with an in-depth perspective of past and present technologies, and the practices of music production.

Music History 1A (15 CU)
This is a stream-specific module for students in the four specialities: Classical, Jazz, Popular Music and Electronic Music. It introduces you to the idea of relating music to a broad range of cultural and historical perspectives, and explores important recorded works specific to your specialisation. In addition, foundations in research and the ability to evaluate evidence are introduced in order to generate informed and personally owned outputs in written and oral forms.

• Classical Performance Specialisation
Classical Performance students are introduced to the history of Western Classical Music during the common practice period – from the formation of Tonal Harmony until the rise of Post-Tonal approaches at the beginning of the 20th century. It follows important shifts in Classical Music culture such as the transition in Italy from Prima Prattica to Seconda Prattica, the consolidation of the tonal system, Western musical notation, new forms of musical rhetoric and the establishment of standard instrumental combinations. The component also considers the great advances during this time in the sciences and philosophy, many of which became the foundations of modern thought. Exemplar works from key composers in a variety of Classical Music genres are discussed and analysed in light of these developments.

• Jazz Performance Specialisation
Jazz Performance students are introduced to the history of American jazz from the late 19th century to the 1950s. It follows the principal pathways of the genre’s development from its roots in New Orleans through the Big Band era, to the birth of Bebop and the transition of jazz from a popular music to an 'art-music' in the 1940s. It explores the formation of a range of standard instrumental combinations in jazz, including the Big Band and the modern Jazz Quintet, and the beginnings of the proliferation and influence of stylistic trends, artistic movements and individuals on the development of the genre in the post WWII era. The different cultural, social, political and economic circumstances and their influence on the development of jazz will be analysed and discussed through listening to original recordings, using text-based resources and visual presentations.

• Popular Music Performance/Composition and Arranging Specialisation
Popular Music and Composition and Arranging students are introduced to the principal genres in Popular Music and their relationships to one another. It follows the evolution of the popular music industry, the influence of commercial interests on artists and performers, the music’s influence on society, and the socio-political events that have influenced the genreʼs development. Key periods under examination include the early roots of Popular Music through to the birth of rock and roll (R&R), and the subsequent generic developments of the 1960s, up to the British Invasion. This includes the pioneers of R&R – Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis and others – and continues with the Brill Building and the importance of the songwriters of the 60s, as well as the birth of the “producer/songwriter” such as Phil Spector, Leiber and Stoller, and Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys. Bob Dylan and The Beatles are given special attention as the playing field of Popular Music takes a significant turn in the mid-sixties.

• Electronic Music Specialisation
Electronic Music students are introduced to the history, theory and techniques of electronic and computer music. Focusing on aesthetic principles and cultural contexts, the module fosters an environment for critical evaluation and debate when evaluating qualities of electronic music compositions. Lessons consist tracing the evolution of electronic music focusing on early electronic instruments such as the Theremin, Ondes-Martenot and techniques of Musique Concrète and their influence on the early developments and aesthetics of electronic music. The evolution of electronic mediums, synthesisers and early computer music will also be studied.

Music History 1B (15 CU)
This is a stream-specific module for students in four specialities of the course: Classical, Jazz, Popular Music and Electronic Music and builds on the knowledge base established in Music History 1A. This module develops your ability to relate music to a broad range of cultural and historical contexts and explores important recorded works specific to your specialisation.

Principal Study 1B (15 CU)
This is a specialised module with two components that creatively and aesthetically expands upon the fundamental techniques in instrumental performance, composition and electronic music established in Principal Study 1A. Principal Study 1B is delivered in one-to-one lessons for Performers and group lessons for Composers and Electronic Music specialists. In addition, students in Classical, Jazz, Popular Performance and Electronic Music build upon and develop the foundation established in Sight Reading in Principal Study 1A, while Composition and Arranging students develop their abilities further in the component of Conducting.

Principal Study 1B develops the interpretive and aesthetic skills required for instrumental/vocal performance, composing and programming software within your specialisation, together with further developing the ability to engage in focussed and productive self-directed practice. Performers are mentored in the requirements for performing important repertoires for their instrument within their chosen specialism, with an increasing focus on the preparation of specific works to be performed for the student’s recital programme. Composition and Arranging students further develop their technical ability in the areas of harmony and counterpoint, including the ability to develop materials into well-formed and coherent musical structures for their recital presentations. Electronic Music specialists enhance their ability to manipulate various computer softwares to create and develop new musical works for their portfolio presentations.

You are recommended to engage in an increasing amount of self-directed individual practice/composition/programming per week as appropriate for this level of study based on the tasks set by the Principal Study teacher in preparation for your recital and portfolio presentations. This self-directed practice is to be documented in a reflective journal. The journal should focus on your learning processes, document progress and challenges, skills learnt in the Principal Study lesson and your application to music-making situations.

In addition, as a fundamental skill set of Principal Study 1B, sight reading and conducting are delivered in increasing depth and complexity, building on the technical foundation of Principal Study 1A.

• Classical/Jazz/Popular Music Performance Specialisations
Preparing a programme of works at an appropriate standard of difficulty for this level, within the stylistic borders of your specialisation, to be performed at an end of semester recital is the primary focus here. You are mentored by lecturers throughout the semester in one-to-one lessons, working towards achieving significant levels of technical control, memorisation, musicality, interpretation, and commitment to the works being performed. In addition, you will engage in group sight-reading classes, establishing a deeper understanding of a reading-at-sight repertoire stylistically appropriate to your specialisation, culminating in an exam at the end of the semester.

• Composition and Arranging Specialisation
Composing a programme of well-formed and coherent works covering broad stylistic areas, to be performed at an end of semester recital is the primary focus here. Composition and Arranging students are mentored by a lecturer throughout the semester in group classes, working towards achieving significant levels of craftsmanship (thematic development, form, notation and presentation of your scores), communication of ideas, aesthetic value, and musical judgement and sensitivity. In addition, Composition and Arranging students are expected to conduct their own scores (where appropriate) during the recital. Conducting classes in Principal Study 1B build on the foundation of technique established in Principal Study 1A, establishing a deeper understanding of interpreting and conducting foundational repertoire and their own compositions, culminating in a separate exam at the end of the semester.

• Electronic Music Specialisation
Principal Study 1B for Electronic Music students builds on the skills and knowledge introduced in Principal Study 1A by exploring more advanced possibilities with a computer-based audio production environment. Projects and exercises will task you to demonstrate foundational and intermediate knowledge in the technical aspects of digital audio, synchronisation, MIDI and the use of creative software. In addition, Electronic Music students engage in group score-reading classes to establish a foundation in reading and interpreting various musical notations stylistically appropriate to their specialisation, culminating in an exam at the end of semester.

Ensemble Workshop 1B (15 CU)
This is a module with three components made up of Specialised Ensemble (specialised), Performance Workshop (specialised) and Creative Music Ensemble (combined). It develops the ensemble skills introduced in Ensemble Workshop 1A, including performing effectively as part of a group, improvising, presenting, and communicating musical intentions clearly to an audience and to each other musical intentions clearly to an audience and each other.

Specialised Components
Ensembles
You will rehearse and develop contemporary repertoire and develop skills in improvisation significant to your specialisation, alongside original student works, and perform these pieces within your specialised performance workshop.

• Classical Performance Specialisation
This component develops upon the foundations of Specialised Ensemble 1A, continuing to focus on improvisational fluency within the stylistic framework of the Classical Period. You learn to apply Classical Period improvisational techniques to intervals, major and minor scales, chords, chord progressions, non-chord tones, meter, rhythms, syncopation, sequence, phrase, motific development, modulation to closely related keys, as well as the binary and ternary forms.

• Composition & Arranging Specialisation
This component continues to develop ensemble awareness in key areas such as balance, tuning, dynamics, tempo cohesion and style interpretation. You will attend gamelan ensemble class on a weekly basis, learning gamelan repertoire and different instruments that constitute the gamelan. This component also gives composers valuable experience with the performative aspects of gamelan music, which can be applied to their compositions.

• Jazz/Popular Performance Specialisation
This component develops ensemble skills and collective music-making, building on the foundations introduced in Specialised Ensemble 1A. You will attend ensemble classes on a weekly basis with a small pop group/jazz combo supervised by a member of staff. These groups work towards a thorough understanding of a wide range of standard repertoire and compositional techniques unique to your specialisation. In addition to studying genre-specific repertoire, students in Pop and Jazz are expected to compose music within the tradition of their specialisation throughout the semester, under the guidance of their ensemble tutor for performance and critique in their respective performance workshops.

• Electronic Music Specialisation
This component develops ensemble skills and collective music-making, building on the basic concepts introduced in Specialised Ensemble 1A. You will attend ensemble classes on a weekly basis, and through instructor-led projects investigate areas of research in live performance utilising methods including original instrument building, circuit bending, interactive composition and electro-acoustic composition and improvisation. The class develops ideas and pieces in a collective and directed process for performance in the Electronic Music Performance Workshop. The purpose of the class is to focus on innovative techniques, and the unique and challenging aspects of playing in an electronic ensemble, such as ensemble balance, listening to each other and cohesive improvising.

Performance Workshop
Workshop classes are specialised and concentrate on the unique stylistic, performative qualities and processes of each specialisation. Lecturer and student feedback and critique of each other’s work during performance workshop is a critical element to this component.

• Classical Performance Specialisation
Classical performance workshop allows classical students from all year levels to present solo or ensemble work as a part of the class, in keeping with the specific repertoire and performance practice unique to this specialisation. A concentration on the fundamental repertoire of classical music performance forms the basis of this class.

• Jazz/Popular Music Performance Specialisation
Jazz and Popular Music Performance workshops will see students (in separate classes) perform. They will be critiqued by staff and fellow students from all levels each week. These sessions cover areas including chamber group performance awareness, balance, cohesion and the interpretation of specific repertoire unique to the two specialisations. For instance, jazz students will be critiqued on their ability to perform and improvise with repertoire and original material based on the Jazz tradition. Pop musicians will also be required to perform repertoire and original compositions from the pop music tradition.

• Composition & Arranging Specialisation
Composition and Arranging workshop is a class that enables composer specialists from all year levels to present their work and have it critiqued by their peers. The class is also an opportunity for lecturers to present their own work and discuss the work of other significant 20th century and new millennium composers.

• Electronic Music Specialisation
Electronic Music workshop is a class that enables Electronic Music specialists to present works-in-progress developed in Electronic Music Ensemble, to be critiqued by lecturers and peers from all levels within the specialisation.

Common Component
Creative Music Ensemble
In addition to the students working in streamed ensembles, this module requires you to participate in a cross-specialisation ensemble. This ensemble comprises a weekly class to perform, and workshops that explore collective music-making across the five specialisations in Level 1. The creative music ensemble is a concept-driven ensemble that engages with music and sound-making from a broad spectrum of approaches found in the 20th and early 21st centuries, including  graphic scores, improvisation, electro-acoustic music and the relationship between ‘noise’ and music.

Level 2

You will build on your established foundation of knowledge, while being introduced to new composition techniques, research methods and approaches to recording and producing your own music.

Principal Study 2A (15 CU)
This module is a specialised module and is delivered in one-to-one lessons for performers and group lessons for composition and arranging and electronic music specialists. This module refines and develops your physical dexterity, control of the instrument/voice, compositional technique and programming software. It also builds on the powers of sustained concentration and focus established in Principal Study 1A and 1B. In addition, you develop an awareness and understanding of the cultural conventions and symbolic meanings associated with 20th century and new millennium repertoires. Composer specialists refine and develop their capacity to conceive musical ideas, and to manipulate them in an inventive way. Electronic Music specialists further refine their ability to use and create computer software for musical tasks including composing, performing, synthesising musical sound with other media, such as video, digital animation, and interactive web applications.

You are recommended to engage in an increasing amount of self-directed individual practice/composition/programming per week as appropriate for this level of study and based on the tasks set by the Principal Study teacher in preparation for your technical exams at the conclusion of the semester. This self-directed practice is to be documented in a reflective journal. The journal should focus on your learning processes, document progress and challenges, skills learnt in the Principal Study lesson and your application to music-making situations.

• Classical Performance Specialisation
A refinement and development of physical dexterity and control of the instrument or voice is the primary focus here, with a technical exam comprising an etude and appropriate technical exercises to be performed at the conclusion of the semester. In addition, you develop an awareness and understanding of the cultural conventions and symbolic meanings associated with 20th and 21st centuries repertoires and genres.

• Jazz Performance Specialisation
A refinement and development of physical dexterity and control of the instrument or voice is the primary focus ihere, with a technical exam comprising appropriate technical exercises undertaken at the conclusion of the semester. In addition, you develop an awareness and understanding of the cultural conventions and symbolic meanings associated with repertoires found in post bebop era.

• Popular Music Performance Specialisation
A refinement and development of physical dexterity and control of the instrument or voice is the primary focus here, with a technical exam comprising appropriate scales, etudes and technical exercises to be performed at the conclusion of the semester. In addition, you develop an awareness and understanding of the cultural conventions and symbolic meanings with associated repertoires found in contemporary pop.

• Composition and Arranging Specialisation
Further development of the fundamentals of harmony, counterpoint and orchestration techniques is the primary focus here. These are delivered in a group class with structured projects further developing your ability to  conceive musical ideas, and to manipulate them in an inventive way culminating in a folio presentation at the conclusion of the semester.  In addition, Level 2 composition and arranging students are increasingly encouraged to collaborate with other gentres and performing art forms, such as dance and theatre, as well as other musical genres, so as to further expand their compositional and arranging experience and knowledge of idioms and instruments.

• Electronic Music Specialisation
Further explorations of artistic expression and technical requirements of sound design and multimedia production, while introducing you to key historical works and artists who work directly with technology to create sound and multimedia works, is the primary focus here. Principal Study 2A enables you to develop an understanding of basic software and hardware programming as well as the prototyping of electronic circuits using basic electronic components, breadboards and the Arduino micro-controller. In addition, you will learn various aspects of programming through practical experimentation and applications.

Ensemble Workshop 2A (15 CU)
This module refines your ensemble skills from the foundation laid in Ensemble Workshop 1A & 1B and develops your artistic and expressive skills to communicate music more convincingly to the listener. In addition, you learn to explore and integrate a broader array of unfamiliar musical sounds, concepts and repertoires inherent in contemporary performance practice within Creative Music Ensemble.

Ensembles
You will rehearse and develop contemporary repertoire significant to your specialisation, alongside original student works, and perform these pieces within your specialised performance workshop.

• Classical Performance Specialisation
This component builds upon the improvisational techniques learnt in Ensemble Workshop 1A & 1B, covering the Classical Period and expands your improvisational vocabulary, focussing on the Baroque Period. Areas of study in this module include Tonality and Figured Bass in the Baroque Period, Rhythm, Melody, Harmony, Dissonance, and Onamentation in the Baroque and Classical Periods.

• Composition and Arranging Specialisation
This component develops ensemble awareness in key areas such as balance, tuning, dynamics, tempo cohesion and style interpretation, and builds upon the foundation established in Ensemble Workshop 1A & 1B. You attend a percussion ensemble class on a weekly basis that exposes you to 20th century classical percussion repertoire and performance techniques. The aim of the ensemble is to give you valuable experience with the performative aspects of chamber music and sufficient knowledge and skills to be able to compose for percussion.

• Jazz Music/Popular Music Performance Specialisation
This component develops and enhances your ensemble skills and collective music-making, building on the skills established in Ensemble Workshop 1A & 1B. You attend ensemble class on a weekly basis with a small jazz combo/pop group, supervised by a member of staff. These groups work towards a thorough understanding of broader and increasingly complex repertoire and compositional techniques unique to their specialisation. In addition to studying genre-specific repertoire, students in Jazz and Pop are expected to compose more music within the tradition of their specialisation throughout the semester, under the guidance of their ensemble tutor, for performance and critique in their respective performance workshops.

• Electronic Music Specialisation
This component develops and enhances ensemble skills and collective music-making in the Electronic Music specialisation, building on the skills established in Ensemble Workshop 1A & 1B. You attend ensemble classes on a weekly basis, and through instructor-led projects investigate areas of research in live performance utilising methods including original instrument building, circuit bending, interactive composition, electro-acoustic composition and improvisation. These groups work towards a thorough understanding of broader and increasingly complex repertoire and compositional techniques unique to their specialisation. The class develops ideas and pieces in a collective and directed process for performance in the Electronic Music Performance Workshop. The purpose of the class is to focus on innovative techniques, and the unique and challenging aspects of playing in an electronic ensemble, such as ensemble balance, listening to each other and cohesive improvising.

Performance Workshop
Workshop classes are specialised and concentrate on the unique stylistic, performative qualities and processes of each specialisation. Student feedback and critique of each other’s work during performance workshop is a critical element to this component.

• Classical Performance Specialisation
Classical performance workshop allows classical students to present solo or ensemble work as a part of the class, in keeping with the specific repertoire and performance practice unique to this specialisation. A concentration on 20th Century and new millennium works align with the School's focus on contemporary works, and regional composers will form the basis of the repertoire in this class.

• Jazz Music/Popular Music Performance Specialisations
Jazz and Popular Music performance workships will see students perform and be critiqued by staff and fellow students each week (in specialised classes), covering areas including chamber group performance awareness, balance, cohesion and the interpretation of specific repertoire unique to the two specialisations. For instance, jazz students will be critiqued on their ability to perform and improvise with repertoire and original material based on the Jazz tradition. Pop musicians will also be required to perform repertoire and original compositions from the pop music tradition.

• Composition & Arranging Specialisation
Composition and Arranging workshop is a class that enables composer specialists to present their work and have it critiqued by their peers. The class is also an opportunity for lecturers to present their own work and discuss the work of other significant 20th and 21st centuries composers.

• Electronic Music Specialisation
Electronic Music workshop is a class that enables Electronic Music specialists to present works-in-progress developed in Electronic Music Ensemble, to be critiqued by lecturers and peers from all levels within the specialisation.

Creative Music Ensemble
In addition to you working in streamed ensembles, the ensemble workshop module requires you to participate in a cross-specialisation ensemble. Creative Music Ensemble builds on the conceptual frameworks outlined and established in Ensemble Workshop 1A & 1B. This ensemble includes a weekly class to perform, and workshops that explore collective music-making across the five specialisations of The School of Contemporary Music. The creative music ensemble is a concept-driven ensemble that engages with music and sound-making from a broad spectrum of approaches, including graphic scores, improvisation and live ‘conduction’ techniques.

Music Skills and Technology 2A (15 CU)
This module builds on the foundation of knowledge established in Music Skills and Technology 1A and 1B, and is a specialised and common module reflecting the different technical and creative demands of each specialisation. Jazz and Popular Music students attend specialised arranging classes that are specific to their respective genres, enhancing their ability to become rounded performers/composers. Classical performers and Composition specialists take classical theory and analysis class that continue to expand and develop their knowledge in Western tonal harmony, and their ability to interpret repertoire. Electronic Music students attend Computer Music Composition classes that build on their existing foundations in computer software knowledge. In addition, all specialisations attend Insights Into Music Production and Production Project, where you are introduced to contextual and practical approaches to recording and producing music.

• Classical Performance and Composition & Arranging Specialisation
Classical Theory and Analysis (specialised for classical and composition students) builds upon the theoretical basis established in Music Skills and Technology 1A and 1B. It refines and develops your understanding of theoretical concepts from the common practice period (tonal harmony), and introduces you to the music of the late romantic and 20th centuries and concepts behind the organisation of atonal material through the analysis of exemplar works from the era. This is in addition to classical performers seeking out examples from their performance repertoire, and composers looking at their original compositions to emphasise the connection between theory and practice.

• Jazz Performance Specialisation
Building on the theoretical tools established in Music Skills and Technology 1A and 1B, Jazz Performance students use various combinations of the jazz combo format as an arranging model, while developing compositional skills in melodic and harmonic structures that include re-harmonisation techniques, and the capacity to manipulate ideas in an inventive and individual way within the jazz idiom. 

• Popular Music Performance Specialisation
Building on the theoretical tools established in Music Skills and Technology 1A and 1B, Popular Performance students use various combinations of the pop group format as a model, while developing compositional skills in melodic and harmonic structures, within the pop song form, generating lyrics, and the capacity to manipulate ideas in an inventive and individual way within this style. 

• Electronic Music Specialisation
Building on the theoretical tools established in Music Skills and Technology 1A and 1B, Electronic Music students further refine their understanding of computer-based composition. The component introduces you to the use of graphical programming software for computer music composition and performance, and explores the key principles and concepts of digital signal processing. In addition, Computer Music Composition provides a platform for you to explore and build unique software tailored to many practical applications within your practice as a computer-based composer and/or performer.

Insights into Music Production
Insights into Music Production is a component delivered to all specialisations, and is an introduction to the aesthetic, philosophical, and technical decision-making processes involved in producing and arranging commercial recordings. It is delivered through a series of informative music industry interviews and documentary presentations devoted to the subject. In addition, an in-depth analysis of arranging styles that span more than five decades will be offered, along with regular open-forum Q&A sessions offering solutions to frequently encountered arranging and production challenges.

Production Project 1
Building upon a foundation of skills developed in Music Skills and Technology 1A and 1B,  Production Project offers you the opportunity to record a series of works that showcase your activities as a performer, composer and/or electronic music specialist. This is achieved by means of a step-by-step process of recording a folio of works for demonstration purposes. Presented in part through a class and personal studio time, where ongoing projects are continually accessed in play-back form and critiqued by the Lecturer and other students, the completed folio becomes a document for entry level into the music industry. Production Project emphasises the importance of constructing oneʼs own timetable, ensuring adequate preparation, and meeting deadlines for the completion of your folio. In addition, you develop problem-solving skills such as the ability to react to new situations, decoding information and ideas, dealing with complex situations, and finding ways of working with others under pressure.

Critical Thinking (15 CU)
This module introduces the basic skills necessary to successfully engage in critical reading and writing, such as premises of arguments; inductive and deductive arguments; argument validity, strength and cogency; common fallacies, assumptions and biases; and use of empirical evidence.

Principal Study 2B (15 CU)
This is a specialised module that creatively and aesthetically expands upon the fundamental techniques in performance, composition and electronic music established in Principal Study 2A. Principal Study 2B is delivered in one-to-one lessons for Performers, and group lessons for Composers and Electronic Music specialists.

Principal Study 2B develops advanced interpretive and aesthetic skills required for instrumental/vocal performance, composing, and programming software within your specialisation. Performers are mentored in the requirements for performing significant repertoires for their chosen specialism, with an increasing focus on the preparation of original and contemporary works to be performed for a recital programme at the end of the semester. Composition and Arranging students further develop their technical and conceptual abilities, developing materials into well-formed and coherent musical structures for their recital presentations. Electronic Music specialists develop their ability to manipulate various computer softwares at an advanced level, to create and develop new musical works for their portfolio presentations. In addition, all students in Principal Study 2B develop an awareness and understanding of the cultural conventions and symbolic meanings associated with 20th Century and new millennium repertoires and genres.

You are recommended to engage in an increasing amount of self-directed individual practice/composition/programming per week as appropriate for this level of study based on the tasks set by the Principal Study teacher in preparation for your recital and portfolio presentations. This self-directed practice is to be documented in a reflective journal. The journal should focus on your learning processes, document progress and challenges, skills learnt in the Principal Study lesson and your application to music-making situations.

• Classical Performance/Jazz Performance/Popular Music Performance Specialisations
Preparing a programme of works at an appropriate standard of difficulty for this level, within the stylistic borders of your specialisation, to be performed at an end of semester recital is the primary focus here. You are mentored by lecturers throughout the semester in one to one lessons, working towards achieving significant levels of technical control, memorisation, musicality, interpretation, and focus and commitment to the works being performed. Classical performers are increasingly focussed on the performance of contemporary works, while Jazz and Popular Music Performers develop their abilities to compose and perform their original works.

• Composition and Arranging Specialisation
Composing a programme of well-formed and coherent works covering broad stylistic areas, to be performed at an end of semester recital, is the primary focus here. Composition and Arranging students are mentored by a lecturer throughout the semester in group classes, working towards achieving advanced levels of craftsmanship (thematic development, form, notation and presentation of scores), communication of ideas, aesthetic value, musical judgement and sensitivity. In addition, Composition and Arranging students are expected to conduct their own scores (where appropriate) during their recitals.

• Electronic Music Specialisation
Principle Study 2B develops a greater aesthetic awareness, as you are required to understand the physical and psychological aspects of sound and sound creation in its relationship to visual media and acoustic space. A refinement of the ability to use and create computer software for musical tasks in collaboration with creative coding, electronics prototyping, interactive art, are some of the primary concerns of this module. You are then required to use this knowledge in all aspects of the music creation process.

Ensemble Workshop 2B (15 CU)
Ensemble Workshop 2B is a module with three components made up of Specialised Ensemble (specialised), Performance Workshop (specialised) and Creative Music Ensemble (combined). It develops the ensemble skills introduced in Ensemble Workshop 2A, including the ability to lead and perform effectively and productively as part of a group, to improvise in more diverse contexts, and to communicate original and contemporary musical ideas clearly to an audience and each other.

Specialised Ensemble
• Classical Performance Specialisation
This component builds upon the improvisational techniques learnt in Ensemble Workshop 2A by covering the Baroque Period, and expands upon your improvisational vocabulary by focussing on the Romantic Period. Areas of study in this module include Tonality, Rhythm, Melody, Harmony, Dances of the 19th Century, and Etudes and Virtuosity in the Romantic Period.

• Composition and Arranging Specialisation
This component develops ensemble awareness in key areas such as balance, tuning, dynamics, tempo cohesion and style interpretation, and builds upon the skill sets established in Ensemble Workshop 2A by exposing you to more demanding repertoire. You attend a percussion ensemble class on a weekly basis that exposes you to 20th century classical percussion repertoire and performance techniques. The aim of the ensemble is to give you valuable experience with the performative aspects of chamber music, and sufficient knowledge and skills to be able to compose for percussion. 

• Jazz/Popular Music Performance Specialisation
This component develops and enhances your ensemble skills and collective music-making, building on the skills established in Ensemble Workshop 2A. You attend ensemble class on a weekly basis with a small jazz combo/pop group supervised by a member of staff. These groups work towards a thorough understanding of broader and increasingly complex repertoire and composing techniques. In addition to studying broader repertoire, students in Jazz and Pop are expected to compose more music, developing their own voices throughout the semester under the guidance of their ensemble tutor for performance and critique in their respective performance workshops.

• Electronic Music Specialisation
This component develops and enhances ensemble skills and collective music-making in the Electronic Music specialisation, building on the skills established in Ensemble Workshop 2A. You will attend ensemble classes on a weekly basis, and through instructor-led projects, investigate areas of research in live performance utilising methods including original instrument building, circuit bending, interactive compositio, electro-acoustic composition and improvisation. These groups work towards a thorough understanding of broader and increasingly complex repertoire and compositional techniques. The class develops ideas and pieces in a collective and directed process for performance in the Electronic Music Performance Workshop. The purpose of the class is to focus on innovative techniques, the unique and challenging aspects of playing in an electronic ensemble, such as ensemble balance, listening to each other and cohesive improvising.

Performance Workshop
Workshop classes are specialised and concentrate on the unique stylistic, performative qualities and processes of each specialisation. Student feedback and critique of each other’s work during performance workshop is a critical element to this component.

•  Classical Performance Specialisation
Classical performance workshop allows classical students to present solo and or ensemble work as a part of the class, in keeping with the specific repertoire and performance practice unique to this specialisation. A concentration on 20th Century and new millennium works aligns with with the School's focus on contemporary works, and regional composers will form the basis of the repertoire in this class.

• Jazz/Popular Music Performance Specialisation
Jazz and Popular Music performance workships will see students perform and be critiqued by staff and fellow students each week (in specialised classes), covering areas including chamber group performance awareness, balance, cohesion and the interpretation of specific repertoire unique to the two specialisations, with an increasing emphasis on original works that showcase your individuality.

• Composition and Arranging Specialisation
Composition and Arranging workshop is a class that enables composer specialists to present their work and have it critiqued by their peers. The class is also an opportunity for lecturers to present their own work and discuss the work of other significant 20th and 21st century composers.

• Electronic Music Specialisation
Electronic Music workshop is a class that enables Electronic Music specialists to present works-in-progress developed in Electronic Music Ensemble to be critiqued by lecturers and peers from all levels within the specialisation.

Creative Music Ensemble
In addition to you working in streamed ensembles, the ensemble workshop module requires you to participate in a cross-specialisation ensemble. Creative Music Ensemble builds on the conceptual frameworks outlined and established in Ensemble Workshop 2A. This ensemble comprises a weekly class to perform, and workshops that explore collective music-making across the five specialisations of The School of Contemporary Music. The creative music ensemble is a concept-driven class that engages with music and sound-making from a broad spectrum of approaches from the late 20th century onwards, including graphic scores, improvisation and live ‘conduction’ techniques.

Interdisciplinary Project
Interdisciplinarity is a key principle of a LASALLE arts education. Exploration of interdisciplinarity in your creative practice will provide you with the platform to work across disciplinary boundaries and explore new ways of developing ideas, concepts and practices.

In this module, you will be required to undertake an interdisciplinary project. You will have the opportunity to work with team members from different programmes and disciplines on a common project brief. As a team, you will learn to integrate knowledge and skills from various disciplines to produce new insights and/or outcomes.

Music Skills and Technology 2B (15 CU)
Music Skills and Technology 2B develops and builds upon the knowledge established in Music Skills and Technology 2A, and is a specialised and common module reflecting the different technical and creative demands of each specialisation. Jazz and Popular Music students attend specialised arranging classes that are specific to their respective genres, enhancing their ability to become rounded performer/composers. Classical performers and Composition specialists take classical theory and analysis classes that continue to expand and develop their knowledge in Western tonal harmony, and their ability to interpret repertoire. Electronic Music students attend Computer Music Composition classes, building on their existing foundations in computer software knowledge. In addition, all specialisations attend introductory classes in Audio Mastering and continue to develop their recording portfolios in Production Project.

• Classical Performance & Composition and Arranging Specialisations
Classical Theory and Analysis (specialised for classical and composition students) builds upon the skills established in Music Skills and Technology 2A. It refines and develops your understanding of theoretical concepts from the late romantic and 20th centuries, and concepts concerning the organisation of atonal material through the analysis of exemplar works from the era. This is in addition to classical performers seeking out examples from their performance repertoire, and composers analysing their original compositions to emphasise the connection between theory and practice.

• Jazz Performance Specialisation
Building on the theoretical tools established in Music Skills and Technology 2A, Jazz Performance students use various combinations of the jazz combo format as an arranging model; while developing more contemporary composition and arranging skills in melodic and harmonic structures, and the capacity to conceive more complex musical ideas and through manipulation in inventive and individual ways.

• Popular Music Performance Specialisation
Building on the theoretical tools established in Music Skills and Technology 2A, Popular Performance students use various combinations of the pop group format as a model, while developing more contemporary compositional skills in melodic and harmonic structures, pop song form, generating lyrics, and the capacity to conceive more complex musical ideas through manipulation in inventive and individual ways. 

• Electronic Music Specialisation
Advanced Computer Music Composition is a component offered to Electronic Music specialists and refines your understanding of computer-based composition established in Music Skills and Technology 2A. The component develops the ability to use advanced methods in graphical programming software for computer music composition and performance, and develops further key principles and concepts of digital signal processing established in Music Skills and Technology 2A. In addition, Advanced Computer Music Composition provides a platform for you to explore and build unique software tailored to many practical applications within your practice as a computer-based composer and/or performer.

Audio Mastering
Audio Mastering is delivered in specialised and combined classes with Electronic Music students taking specialised classes, and Classical, Composition, Jazz and Pop students attending combined classes. The programme recognises that students taking the Electronic Music specialisation benefit greatly from a specialised class, as their needs differ in relation to industry expectations. Audio Mastering introduces you to the basic techniques of Mastering Music for CD duplication. The component covers aspects of audio ear training, including frequency recognition, delay times, reverberation times and pre-delay. In addition, you study signal processing such as compression and equalisation, whereas in Music Skills and Technology 1A and 1B, the focus was on the sound of individual instruments. Now, you are required to process the sound of entire mixes.

Production Project 2
Built upon the foundation and experience established in Music Skills and Technology 2A, Production Project in Music Skills and Technology 2B offers you the opportunity to continue to develop a body of recordings that showcase your activities as a performer, composer and/or electronic music specialist. This is achieved by a step-by-step process of recording a folio of works for professional purposes. Presented in part through a class and personal studio time, where ongoing projects are continually accessed in play-back form and critiqued by the Lecturer and other students, the completed  folio becomes a document for entry into the music business. Production Project emphasises the importance of constructing oneʼs own timetable, ensuring adequate preparation, and meeting deadlines for the completion of your folio. In addition, you develop problem-solving skills auch as the ability to react to new situations, decoding information and ideas, dealing with complex situations, and finding ways of working with others under pressure.

Contextual Studies (15 CU)
Contextual Studies builds on the foundation laid in Music History in Level 1, as well as Critical Thinking in Level 2 Semester 1. Contextual Studies explores Eastern and Western aesthetics in music, critical theory and modern music from the 20th Century onwards. It introduces you to major themes in Asian musical aesthetics within Confucianism, Buddhism and Islamic thinking. In addition, Contextual Studies introduces you to the building blocks of Western music aesthetics through an understanding of Formalism, German Idealism, Phenomenology and Symbolism. Major themes in critical theory and aesthetics from 20th Century modernists including Theodor Adorno and John Cage.

Student Exchange Elective (60 CU) 
This module gives you the opportunity to explore fresh perspectives and alternative approaches to your creative discipline, by undertaking a semester-long international learning exchange in another institution. The aim of the module is to provide interested students an opportunity to enrich their learn.

Level 3

You will integrate your skills into professional practice, by producing a portfolio of recorded demos, learning industry practices and completing a major practice-based research project. You will be equipped to work collaboratively and independently, with individuality and self-confidence.

Industry and Community Engagement (20 CU)
This module is designed to enable you to broaden your knowledge of the cultural and creative industries by placing you, as a learning professional, within a professional work environment. The aim of the module is to help you develop work-related knowledge, skills and capabilities, prepare you to pursue opportunities in fields relating to your study, and expose you to a diverse set of professional trajectories. You will map your acquired skills, interests and aspirations against current (and future) opportunities in the cultural and creative industries, while putting to practice skills and knowledge gained in the classroom. You are required to attend various industry preparation workshops, such as resume-writing, interview skills, and etc., as part of this module.

In fulfilment of this module, you can choose one of the following options: 

Option A: Industry-based Internship(s)
You will independently source and apply for internship opportunities. You are required to identify your interest and career-trajectory. These opportunities should be in an organisation where the job functions are related to your discipline. 

The internship may be with a single organisation or an accumulation of short-term work with different companies, to accumulate the minimum 200 hours of on-the-job training. The internship may be spread across a number of days/weeks and need not be a full-time position. Where possible, you are encouraged to go beyond the minimum hours in order to showcase your talent and abilities, which will aid your quest for permanent employment and/or gain more opportunities to learn about the job and industry. 

All internships must be approved by the Programme Leader, prior to commencement, to align with learning aims and outcomes. 

Option B: Negotiated Projects
You will take a proactive and entrepreneurial approach to identify and create a niche for yourself, within the cultural and creative industries. You may undertake a combination of the following types of projects:

  • Industry Live Project: You can source for an industry project, or this can be facilitated through the programme.
  • Entrepreneurial Project: You may devise a business proposal and execute it. 
  • Community Engagement Project: You can engage with a community of your preference, and develop and execute an initiative for them. 
  • Short-term internship (about 100 hours)

To ensure that you fulfil the learning outcomes of this module, all proposals and short-term internship opportunities must be discussed and approved by the Programme Leader. 

Dissertation (40 CU)
This module is the culmination of the research and contextual knowledge that you have acquired during the course of your study. You will be required to undertake in-depth critical research, and present a coherent argument based on investigation and analysis. The chosen topic will be relevant to your main course of study, and will be used to support and inform your specialist practice. It will demonstrate your deep appreciation of your field, and competency of key approaches and methodologies to contextualise it.

You will demonstrate an ability to identify a research topic that is close to your practice or field of study through a clear literature review, and present relevant arguments and hypotheses in the written form of between 6,000 to 8,000 words.

Before commencing your dissertation, you will be required to develop a research proposal outline to demonstrate your research question and approach to completing the dissertation. In consultation with your supervisor, you may form your dissertation around an exegesis that foregrounds your major creative studio practice. Programmes where you are eligible to develop a piece of creative practice as part of your dissertation may be negotiated with your supervisor. In this instance, the word count for the written element may be negotiated, but a minimum word count of 4,000 words is required.

You are expected to undertake a significant amount of independent and self-motivated research. You will be assigned a supervisor who will provide guidance in your research work. You will also be required to attend all dissertation-related classes.

Principal Project 3B (40 CU)
This module is an individually mentored module enabling the student to present a refined and highly developed project that builds on the research and creative activities explored and established in Principal Project 3A. You are given the scope to develop your own content and assessment in consultation with your mentor, the Head of School and in view of the Learning Outcomes of the Module. This module gives you the opportunity to refine and focus a highly individual creative project that could include diverse collaborative ideas and different creative skill sets.

Graduation Performance (60 CU)
This year-long module is the culmination of the experience and knowledge obtained from Principal Study and Ensemble Workshop in Levels 1 and 2, and focuses on you exploring and developing a highly developed project building on the research and creative activities refined over the course of the year for your final showing/recital. You will have weekly lessons within the creative area you are pursuing, in addition to ensemble classes. You are given the scope to develop your own content in consultation with your mentor, the Head of School, and in view of the Learning Outcomes of the Module. This can include developing an interdisciplinary collaboration, diverse ensembles and advanced skills in improvisation. Where Principal Study lessons were focused on delivering skills and knowledge specific to a particular specialisation and repertoire in Levels 1 and 2, Graduation Performance in Level 3 gives you the opportunity to explore diverse collaborative ideas and different creative skill sets.

More Information

Learning methods

Attend lectures, seminars, practical presentations, class participation, rehearsals, journals and masterclasses.

Assessment and course materials

Assessment is an integral part of the learning process and will be formative and diagnostic, as well as summative and evaluative. Feedback to students is provided, wherever appropriate.
 

Download assessment overview PDF  

Internship

You will independently source and apply for internship opportunities. You are required to identify your interest and career trajectory. These opportunities should be in an organisation where the job functions are related to your discipline. 

The internship may be with a single organisation or an accumulation of short-term work with different companies, to accumulate the minimum 200 hours of on-the-job training. The internship may be spread across a number of days/weeks and need not be a full-time position. Where possible, you are encouraged to go beyond the minimum hours in order to showcase your talent and abilities, which will aid your quest for permanent employment and/or gain more opportunities to learn about the job and industry. 

All internships must be approved by the Programme Leader, prior to commencement, to align with learning aims and outcomes.

Programme completion criteria

Students need to accumulate 360 credits from Levels 1 (FHEQ 4), 2 (FHEQ 5) and 3 (FHEQ 6).

Student exchange

LASALLE is committed to providing our students with an international perspective and nurturing them to be global citizens. The opportunity for student exchanges will broaden your network and strengthen your ability to adapt and react to the global changing trends and environment.

“Wonderful. I met a lot of people I am still friends with. I really loved the lectures. The equipment and building are very good. I came to be exposed to another culture and I wasn't disappointed, since Singapore and LASALLE are so multicultural.” 
Exchange student, Pauline Marie Estelle Perrin, from Design Academy Eindhoven

"There are so many international students in LASALLE, thus I learned various design philosophies from them." 
Exchange student, Suzuko Asawa, from Tokyo University of the Arts

Outgoing Exchanges
Students enrolled in our BA(Hons) degree programmes will have the opportunity to go on a semester of overseas exchange with our selected partner institutions. The Student Exchange Elective module (60 credits) is an option for BA(Hons) degree students in Level 2, Semester 2. For more details on the eligibility criteria and the application process, please login to the Learning Portal. For more information or assistance, please email us.  

Incoming Exchanges
LASALLE welcomes reciprocal student exchanges from our partner institutions. Students in our partner institutions can identify a cognate programme from our list of 13 BA(Hons) degree programmes and join us for a semester. Please refer to our academic calendar here.

Deadlines for Incoming Exchange Applications
15 May – Semester 1 intake
15 October – Semester 2 intake

Eligibility
You will need to be an enrolled student from one of our partner institutions. As English is our language of instruction, incoming exchange students from a non-English medium partner institution are expected to have IELTS 6.0 or TOEFL (PBT 550 / CBT 213 / IBT80).

Please fill up our online incoming exchange student form here. You will be contacted by our staff regarding more details on the application process. For more information or assistance, please email us. You may refer to our International Student Guide for information about visa application, accommodation and the expenses for living in Singapore.

Career paths

Make an impact as:
Music Performer, Composer, Music Arranger, Music Director, Recording Engineer, Live Sound Engineer or Film and TV Composer.

Or make your mark in a related career:
Educator, Music Reviewer, Voice Talent or Vocal Coach.

Academics

Tap into the illustrious minds of our faculty members who are movers and shakers in their own disciplines. They will impart, challenge and encourage, as they share their invaluable expertise and experiences with you.

Dean, Faculty of Performing Arts
Head, School of Contemporary Music
Lecturer, Music
Lecturer, Music
Lecturer, Music
Lecturer, Music
Loading

Admission Information

Important Dates

  • Apply by: 15 February 2019
  • Application outcome will be announced by: 29 March 2019
  • Start of Semester: AY2019/2020

(Local Diploma graduates who apply for BA(Hons) programmes will be advised of their application outcomes in late May 2019).

Entry Requirements

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

Singapore
  • Singapore
  • Australia
  • Brunei
  • China (PRC)
  • European Baccalaureate
  • France
  • Germany
  • Hong Kong
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Japan
  • Malaysia
  • Myanmar
  • New Zealand
  • Philippines
  • ROC, Taiwan
  • Russia
  • South Korea
  • Sri Lanka
  • Thailand
  • United Arab of Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States of America
  • Vietnam
Qualifications Remarks
Singapore-Cambridge GCE A-Level 2 A-Level/H2 subjects and a pass in General Paper
Local Polytechnic -
International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma -

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)
Minimum Requirements for Entry into a BA(Hons) Level 2 Programme

  • A relevant diploma in the field or discipline.
  • Your portfolio or audition must be exceptionally strong and demonstrate prior formal training in the relevant arts discipline. The transcript from your diploma course must demonstrate that you have read and passed the equivalents of essential LASALLE modules.

 


Alternative English Language Qualification

Entry Into IELTS TOEFL
BA(Hons) 6.0 PBT IBT
550 80

ADMISSIONS TESTS/PORTFOLIO AND INTERVIEW REQUIREMENTS

You are required to attend an interview and an audition to demonstrate your creative potential. You are expected to demonstrate a strong knowledge of the music you are playing, as well as a clear vision for your own musical future.

Music Training Pre-Requisites

Theory: ABRSM or Trinity Guildhall Grade 6 or higher
Previous qualifications in practical exams are preferred but not a requirement for entry into the Programme. You will be judged solely on your ability to perform during the audition and interview process.

Audition Requirements

Theory/Aural: Complete a music theory and aural test set by us.

Practical: Present three contrasting pieces with the following conditions for your specialism. (Music scores must be submitted to the audition panel.)

Specialism:

1. Classical Performance 
Additional requirements:

  • One Baroque
  • One Romantic
  • One 20th century work

2. Composition and Arranging 

  • Three original and contrasting pieces (live or recorded on CD)
  • Folio of notated and recorded works complete with MIDI file or CD playback

3. Jazz Performance 

  • One ‘Blues’ with an improvised solo
  • One jazz standard with an improvised solo
  • One original composition by you, if possible

4. Electronic Music 

  • Three original and contrasting pieces (live or recorded on CD)
  • Folio of recordings and documentation of music technology related work e.g. recordings, mixing or original electronic music on CD

5. Popular Music Performance 

  • Two contrasting songs from different styles
  • One original composition by you, if possible
Fees
Components

Tuition Fees (per annum)

BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONS) TUITION FEES FOR AUGUST 2019 INTAKE (PER ANNUM FEES)

Funded (Subsidised Fees) Non-Funded (Full Fees)
Singaporeans Singapore PR Singaporeans Singapore PR International
S$9,728.98 S$13,794.40* S$19,000 S$21,150 S$23,800
Notes:

*SPRs students who choose to take up the Tuition Grant (TG) will need to make an online application and then sign the TG Deed with the Government of Singapore. Under the terms of the Tuition Grant Deed, you will be required to work for a Singapore entity for a period of three years upon graduation. For more information, visit tgonline.moe.gov.sg

  • Funded/Subsidised fees for Singaporeans and Singapore PR qualify for GST Subsidy from MOE, all other fees include 7% GST.
  • Fees are due on the first day of each semester.
  • Fees are subject to change.
  • Correct as at November 2017.
 

Application Fees

A non-refundable application fee (inclusive of 7% GST) is chargeable per application. Application is only complete upon receipt of your application fee and all necessary documents. Please ensure your application fee is paid and documents are submitted within seven working days from the submission date of your online application. LASALLE reserves the right to withdraw the applicant if the application fee remains unpaid and documents are not received by the due date.

Singaporean / Singapore Permanent Resident Applicants International Applicants
S$60.00 S$120.00
 

Additional Costs

Basic materials for learning are provided by the College.

As a developing artist, you are required to have certain items that are personal to you and cannot be shared. Such items include books, dance shoes, rehearsal clothes, safety boots, portable musical instruments, paints, canvas, basic tools, design software, cameras, etc., that will support you through your three-year learning journey. The College does not encourage the purchase of extravagant or costly materials or equipment. Our lecturers can provide you with affordable suggestions.

You are also encouraged to have your own laptop for education. If you do not own one, computer labs are available on campus with requisite software for you to undertake your work.

There may be opportunities for you to undertake extra-curricular study trips to enhance your overall learning. Trips are not compulsory and may incur additional costs.

 

MORE INFORMATION

Fee Protection Scheme (FPS)

Fee Protection Scheme (FPS) serves to protect students’ fees in the event a Private Education Institution (PEI) is unable to continue operations due to insolvency and/or regulatory closure. The FPS also protects students when the PEI fails to pay penalties or refund fees to the students arising from judgements made against it by the Singapore courts.

In seeking to be an EduTrust-certified PEI, LASALLE is required to adopt the FPS to ensure full protection to all fees paid by their students. Therefore, the FPS is compulsory for students who are taking BA(Hons), MA and Certificate programmes at LASALLE.

Diploma programmes offered by LASALLE are exempted from FPS under the EduTrust requirements of the Committee for Private Education (CPE).

More information on the Committee for Private Education

Medical Insurance Scheme (MIS)

All full-time students of LASALLE are required to be covered under the Medical Insurance Scheme (MIS). The annual coverage of S$20,000 includes school-related activities throughout the programme duration.

The current premium rate of S$18.20 is payable each semester. This premium rate is subject to change based on the prevailing premiums charged by the insurer.

Accepted Modes of Payment

All payment to LASALLE must be made in Singapore Dollars. 

Our accepted payment modes include:

  • DBS Online Banking and ATM Transfer
  • GIRO
  • Cheque/ Bank Draft/ Cashier's Order/ Demand Draft
  • NETS
  • Cash
  • Master/ Visa/ China UnionPay
  • Wired Transfer/ Telegraphic Transfer (Only for International students)
Scholarships & Financial Support

SCHOLARSHIPS

In recognition of outstanding academic excellence, leadership potential, and a passion for creativity and innovation, LASALLE offers a variety of scholarships to new and current students.

Applications for scholarships open from March to May for new students. Other externally sponsored scholarships are also available to students. Enquiries and applications may be directed to the respective organisations.

Please note that miscellaneous fees are not covered by scholarships, bursaries or the Mendaki Tertiary Tuition Fee Subsidy (TTFS).

View Scholarships Offered

FINANCIAL SUPPORT

We are committed to providing a quality education for all our students, and believe that no deserving student should be denied admission because of financial difficulty.

A range of financial assistance schemes, grants and loans are made available to help meet a portion of the educational expenses of students.

Applications for financial assistance open from March to May for new students.

Please note that miscellaneous fees are not covered by scholarships, bursaries or the Mendaki Tertiary Tuition Fee Subsidy (TTFS).

View Bursaries Offered

MORE INFORMATION

Frequently Asked Questions

Download Prospectus

Undergraduate Prospectus
Download PDF
Undergraduate Prospectus (Chinese)
Download PDF
School of Contemporary Music Prospectus
Download PDF
Loading

Take the next exhilarating step with our BA(Hons) Music Programme.